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From UB

Higher ed leaders forecast top 2017 trends

January, 2017
Paul Drayton, president of Rowan College at Burlington County in New Jersey, says higher education remains far too expensive for many students who are most dependent on it for career success.

“College is more important than ever for career success, yet too expensive for far too many students. 3+1 provides all the benefits of both community colleges and four-year universities while lowering the tuition and debt burden on students and increasing our capacity to serve more students at both community colleges and universities. This is the future model of college affordability.”

A look back: Top college stories of 2016

January, 2017

American higher education in 2016 faced increased pressure on performance. Colleges and universities were also being pushed to eliminate administrative and academic silos to help students of all ages and backgrounds succeed. Here’s a look back at what made headlines in higher ed this past year and how campuses responded.

Colleges examining expenses, getting strategic about revenue

January, 2017
Over half of higher ed finance administrators say they plan on modestly increasing tuition revenue expenses.

Keeping student tuition and fees down is the top priority for 2017 selected by campus CFOs and other finance department administrators in a UB survey—yet tuition revenue and nontuition student fees are the biggest anticipated funding categories for the coming year.

Higher ed enters the age of accountability

January, 2017
Public funding levels and the various approaches to affordability—from debt-free college to private-sector loans—will continue to dominate higher ed debates in and outside campus administrative offices.

A greater level of accountability around access and outcomes looms on the horizon for higher ed administrators in 2017 and beyond. Experts across the ideological spectrum predict the federal government and the general public to demand more transparency in the data released about how graduates of specific campus programs fare in the job market. 

Sponsored Content

1/10/2017

The Jeanne Clery Act, passed in 1990, requires all colleges and universities who receive federal funding to share information about crime on campus and their efforts to improve campus safety, as well as inform the public of crime in or around campus. Revised and amended several times since its inception, compliance with the Clery Act requires careful and deliberate coordination among various campus officials and entities.  

Sponsored by: 
Stanley Security
Joseph Gillio,  Senior Director, Strategic Planning & Marketing,  Casio America Inc.

Traditional projectors operate off of a mercury vapor lamp. Casio’s LampFree projectors use a blue laser, phosphor and a red LED light source. This is a major advantage for several reasons...

Linda Ding, Senior Education Program Strategist, Laserfiche

There are three challenges in achieving efficiencies through technology initiatives.

Eileen Smith,  Vice President Marketing and Communications,  Jenzabar

Previously, students were looked at in a very fragmented way: They were either a recruit, an applicant, a student, a potential graduate, a lifelong learner or potential dropout. New tools have caused a shift in how higher ed is viewing students, we can now think of the student in a much more holistic way.

It’s no secret that text messaging is the preferred method of communication for today’s students over email, direct mail or phone calls; a recent study found that some 97 percent say they use texting as their primary form of communication, 73 percent say they want schools to text them, and nearly three quarters of prospective students want to text with admissions counselors. However, only 28 percent report being offered the option to text with their college or university. How should institutions address this gap by reaching students the way they prefer?