Spotlight Story

When CIOs need hard hats

06/2017
It’s not uncommon for officials at institutions, including Lone Star College, to realize the full value of getting technology leaders intimately involved in construction projects right from the get-go after going over budget on a project because IT was brought in too late.

While executing an eight-building, $157 million construction and renovation project in 2014, officials at Del Mar College in Texas forgot one critical player: the tech expert. Information technology administrators weren’t brought on board until just before the design was finalized.

At that point, they had to scramble to integrate technology into a range of facilities—from installing advanced lighting controls in a new fine arts center to adding applications that respond to mobile devices in buildings throughout campus. Because most of the project funding had already been allocated, the technology budget fell short and the team had to dig into other sources to cover the costs.

From UB

Confronting the challenges of digitizing documents

July, 2017
DIGITIZE THIS—Students scan Civil War documents at Bowdoin College.

The mass digitization of literature is complex. The preservation of books, letters and other historical materials calls for advanced technology and a good deal of manpower. Universities are developing better practices around this process, as well as creating software and databases to make this content accessible and search-friendly.

Campus groundbreakings

July, 2017
University of Dayton (Ohio)

Universities undergo construction to upgrade their sports arenas and academic facilities.  

The internet of things begins to impact college construction planning

Campuses have already connected a wide array of objects to the digital world,  including parking meters, washing machines and library stands that show where books are located.

The internet of things technology has the potential to change the way buildings are designed and constructed. For colleges and universities, that could mean enabling people to control the temperature at their individual workstations or light a path in a hallway from a smartphone.

Dozens of ‘elites’ urged to add Pell Grant students

July, 2017
MAY THE FORCE BE WITH THEM—Graduates of USC’s Neighborhood Academic Initiative—a rigorous college-prep program for students from low-income communities near campus—got a ceremonial visit from actor Mark Hamill,  of Luke Skywalker and Star Wars fame, and some of his fictional antagonists.

A small change in admissions at many of the most selective colleges and universities could make a big difference to low-income learners. To meet a goal of having all schools enroll at least 20 percent Pell Grant recipients, about 350 “elite” institutions would have to admit about 20,000 low-income students, says a new report from the Georgetown Center for Education and the Workforce.

Health plan decision-making and negotiating

July, 2017

Form a benefits committee.

At Lawrence University in Wisconsin, a benefits advisory committee works with an insurance broker to contain costs and determine the best plan designs while providing competitive employee benefits. The committee, which is chartered by the president, includes several administrators from finance and HR along with two faculty members.

Sponsored Content

6/28/2017

While students have a variety of options when it comes to paying for college, making unwise financial decisions can lead to negative consequences for the student as well as the institution. Overborrowing, poor planning and budgeting, and misunderstanding financial aid can create seemingly insurmountable debt that can affect academic performance, push students to leave school before completion, and burden them long after graduation.  

Sponsored by: 
6/22/2017

Higher education is in the midst of significant change. Institutions are under pressure to reduce costs and improve the efficiency of operations while providing responsive, quality services to students. Many college and university leaders are turning to transformative technologies such as electronic forms, workflow automation and enterprise content management (ECM) to help them overcome these challenges.

Sponsored by: 

Ian Mortimer was searching for a way to make communication with prospective students at Nazareth College in western New York easier without picking up the phone or sending an email. 

“One of the problems we were facing was having that one-way connection,” says Mortimer, who is vice president for Enrollment Management at Nazareth. “We wanted to find something so we could have a conversation versus just a one-way connection.” 

Which major is best for me? How do I plan my courses? How do I succeed in my courses? What is my career strategy after college? These are all questions students tend to have throughout their educational journey.

Demonstrating on-time completion and positive student outcomes is a major challenge facing today’s colleges and universities. Students and families are expecting institutions to provide the tools and support services to ensure students secure the necessary skills and competencies to prepare them for a successful life.

The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington formed a partnership in the summer of 2015 with the Institute of Translational Health Sciences, the University of Washington Medicine Research Information Technology, and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-Pacific Northwest Region.

The partnership sought to create and fund a space on campus that would accelerate health research and innovation by supporting researchers and investigators and allowing a multifaceted approach to research.