Spotlight Story

3D printer capabilities form the future of higher ed

05/2017
PRINTER POWER—3D printing projects can be completed on campus, such as at Duke University’s Innovation Co-Lab.

Amid students cutting textiles, making shoes, firing ceramics and making prints at the Parsons School of Design’s Making Center in midtown Manhattan is a whole wall of 3D printers. The 28,000-square-foot center’s 15 MakerBot printers churn out everything from jewelry and lacey sculptures to small figurines and architectural models.

Having all the printers in one place is important for both service and cost. “We can take advantage of the volume and offer everything students need while saving money,” says Will McHale, director of the Making Center.

As a result, the $15 million center is one of the busiest places on the school’s urban campus.

From UB

The Central King Building at NJIT

June, 2017
OLD MEETS NEW—The Central King Building at NJIT offers cutting-edge education space amid Gothic architecture. Says President Joel Bloom: “This facility provides ample space for our students to work in teams on projects, which is the learning style of this university.”

A century-old Gothic high school has been transformed into a new biological sciences education and research center as well as the new home for the New Jersey Innovation Institute.

It all adds up: 3D printer options

June, 2017

The essence of 3D printing is a concept called additive manufacturing that builds up the item one layer at a time.

Impact of Title IV fraud

June, 2017

​Criminals who receive financial aid fraudulently basically steal money from bona fide students and institutions.

Full-time student benefits, even for part-time students

June, 2017

It’s known that full-time students graduate more quickly and more often than do their part-time counterparts. But what about students who fluctuate between full- and part-time status?

Strengthening the general ed curriculum

June, 2017
James Muyskens is a professor at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and former president of CUNY Queens College.

The weakest link in the expanding instructional continuum—where we are least successful—is in general education and freshman introductory courses.

Sponsored Content

5/30/2017

Attend this web seminar to learn how the The Duck Store at the University of Oregon has transformed the shopping experience. By implementing a unified commerce platform—complete with in-store and ecommerce functionality on the front end and real-time inventory visibility, order management, CRM, business intelligence, warehouse management, marketing and financials to support it—The Duck Store now has the tools in place to efficiently manage the complexities of their multiple retail locations.

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5/25/2017

Many higher education institutions still rely on inefficient, disparate systems for tracking employee time and attendance. And with workers on campus in a wide variety of jobs, it can be challenging to manage professional, union, auxiliary and student workforces, all at the same time.

Some institutions are turning to automated time and attendance solutions to address these issues, but are unsure of how this change might affect their people, processes, and organization.

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5/24/2017

Nowadays it seems as though we are being asked to do more and more with less and less. That might make sense from a business standpoint as it makes you more profitable, but you run the risk of burning out and stressing out your employees.

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5/23/2017

In recent years, the requirements of public higher education institutions have changed drastically, increasing the pressure to modernize their IT systems.  To meet those challenges, many universities are looking at available options, including the cloud.

Pittsburg State University was faced with disparate, aging tools, requiring it to rely on manual processes that made it difficult to view data across all of its systems.  This, combined with new available technologies and the necessary change to the IT culture on campus made their change journey an adventurous one.

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5/16/2017

Colleges and universities face an increasingly competitive environment for attracting and retaining students.  These challenges are further complicated with tighter funding constraints and the need to keep up with the latest technological advancements to remain competitive. Student ID card systems are not immune to these pressures; outdated ID technology can result in increased costs, long wait times for students, as well as privacy and security issues.

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