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Computers and internet connectivity continue to become vital across industries, from communications to transportation, medicine, energy, manufacturing, defense, finance and many more. But while this technology has enhanced the features and capabilities of everything from household appliances and cars to medical devices and the electrical grid, there are also serious concerns about the vulnerability of all of this hardware.


While faced with state and federal regulations, an increasingly competitive recruitment environment and intense pressure to contain costs, many colleges and universities have been unable to modernize critical business processes, which could help address key challenges in admissions, finance, and fundraising. Siloed data, manual processes and inefficient workflows can be costly, create security vulnerabilities and prevent institution leaders from understanding the true costs of doing business.


Institutional research is crucial to providing college and university leadership with the data required to make the most informed strategic decisions, across a broad range of areas including admissions, academics, finance, enrollment, retention, staffing, facilities and more. In order for this research to be effective, however, it is also important to have a strategy and process to translate the data gathered into actionable information.

The Cisco Security and Trust Organization, Advanced Security and Research team offers a grant program through which higher education research institutions can take action in the evolving cybersecurity threat landscape.

Soon after becoming president of Georgia State University in 2009, Mark P. Becker set out to answer a question: How can you create a better university, in the heart of a large, diverse city, where many of your students are first-generation or low-income, and who face challenges not seen as commonly at a typical flagship institution.

Michael R. Nelson, a professor of internet studies at Georgetown University and former White House staffer, will deliver at keynote speech at UBTech 2016 in Las Vegas.

Michael R. Nelson, a professor of internet studies at Georgetown University, says innovation is about much more than just a good idea. It requires finding new ways to combine existing ideas, products and services into something that people will want. At the heart of that process is collaboration.

For engineers, life has become increasingly complicated in the worlds of nanotechnology, lean manufacturing, and rapid product design and development. We learned from our research that engineering education can no longer deploy conventional, isolated solutions. Indeed, there is rarely an easy, one size fits all, cookie cutter answer in an environment that has uncountable moving parts and continuous technological change and innovation.

Research shows that each generation sees more value in a college education than the one before. Even with the rising cost of higher education, this next generation of college students—Generation Z—is no exception. However, Gen Z does have different preferences and expectations for learning than previous generations. Colleges and universities need to have a solid understanding of this generation in order to meet their expectations and, ultimately, enhance recruitment and retention.

According to Henry J. Neeman, director of the OU Supercomputer Center for Education & Research (OSCER) at Oklahoma University, schools will want to investigate guidelines for their own future HPC platforms. His own institution is seeing ROI from HPC as high as 700 percent from its supercomputer named Boomer.

From where he sits, the keys to a successful HPC platform include:

Imagine thinking thousands of thoughts at the same time. What if each thought was one piece of a really big problem—a problem now solvable in hours or days rather than years because of this simultaneous thought process? That’s what high-performance computing (HPC) does.