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Construction

Higher ed institutions around the nation get creative to drive students to spend more of their time—and money—in campus eateries.

Acoustic design experts discuss: How are higher ed institutions doing in recognizing the importance of acoustics and noise control in new and existing learning spaces? What’s one thing you wish campus administrators understood better about acoustics?

Some colleges and universities approach campus construction sites as living laboratories—setting up instruction opportunities for students.

Scott Cowen, former president of Tulane University in New Orleans, is the author of Winnebagos on Wednesday: How Visionary Leadership Can Transform Higher Education (Princeton University Press, 2018).

In Winnebagos on Wednesday: How Visionary Leadership Can Transform Higher Education, Scott Cowen shows how today’s university is evolving, and how to avoid losing sight of institutional strengths and values.

California State University is the largest four-year public university system in the United States. With 23 campuses and eight off-campus centers, it serves over 479,000 students each year.

Like other higher education institutions, most of CSU’s renovation, alteration and construction projects are concentrated during specific times of year. With campuses spread across the state, access to qualified contractors can be difficult.

Universities undergo construction to upgrade their sports arenas and academic facilities.  

Comprising a three-story classroom building and a two-story advising center connected by a walkway, the Academic Village at Morningside College in Iowa is the first new construction on campus since the 1970s. From state-of-the-art simulation spaces for nursing programs to offices that promote first-year student success, this 35,000-square-foot facility serves a variety of purposes for the Morningside community.

Many small institutions wrestle with the annual assessment of how to manage routine capital projects. A backlog of deferred maintenance items can further complicate planning.

Heading to the campus library used to mean needing serious study silence or a spot for solitary scholarly pursuits. Although the library’s shell may look the same, inside it’s a decidedly different and livelier place.

“The hush-hush is over. Instead you get noise, you get dialogue, you get engagement, you get creativity, you get sharing,” says Jim Draper, vice president and general manager at Gale, the division of Cengage Learning that provides digital and print products to libraries.

While the “curb appeal” of well-manicured lawns as well as easy parking are crucial parts of the first impression a campus makes, how welcome visitors feel once inside the first building they encounter on campus is just as important.

To make their campuses more enticing and friendly to those who aren’t used to making their way around there, some institutions have created welcome centers as a first stop for prospective students, family members, alumni, and other guests.

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