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Nelnet Tuition Payment Plans improve student experience at four University of Colorado campuses

In an effort to best serve a population of over 60,000 students on four campuses, business office leaders across the University of Colorado system (CU) recently decided to evaluate their options to determine if a more efficient payment plan solution existed


The U.S. is home to the largest population of international students in the world. This student demographic enriches educational institutions, but also adds increased complexities. Many institutions struggle to provide a payment experience that is familiar to international students while also efficiently managing the reconciliation process associated with these payments.


Rising student debt and lack of financial literacy among college students are issues of growing concern to higher ed leaders, particularly those focused on non-academic drivers of student success.

Identifying students who are at risk of student loan default and establishing ongoing communication with those students are two key strategies for minimizing borrower default. Financial aid administrators should include these strategies and more in their default prevention programs, so borrowers are aware of their repayment options and less likely to default. This web seminar, originally broadcast on January 28, 2014, featured administrators from two institutions. They described the tools and strategies they have employed to curb loan defaults.

A father I know asked his 9th-grader how his math grades had jumped from C to A-, when prior personal tutoring hadn’t helped. The reply: “Dad, it’s easy! I taught myself using Khan Academy.”

California, Texas, and Florida tend to be bellwether states for education because of their sheer size. So recent legislation proposed in California should have an interesting effect on the $10,000-degree movement. In January, Assemblyman Dan Logue, R-Marysville proposed legislation to make it possible for students to get a degree from the California State University system through closer coordination between high schools, community colleges, and CSU. He later proposed a companion bill for $20,000 degrees from the University of California system.

Despite recent conversations that have been stirring about the value and return on investment of American higher education, there is still a strong public opinion in favor of it, according to a new Gallup/Lumina Foundation poll. The issue, the poll found, lies in how people feel about attainment and the current model of higher ed.

The pressure institutions are facing from the growing student loan debt crisis is felt by all departments, from financial aid to admissions. Schools are struggling to justify tuition costs to prospective students, as well as to ensure recent alumni leave pleased with the institution, despite having student loan debt. In this web seminar, originally broadcast on November 13, 2012, representatives from American Student Assistance (ASA), St.

California Gov. Jerry Brown, with students and teachers behind him, gestures during a news conference after voting Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Oakland, Calif. The governor talked about his support for Proposition 30 that will increase funding for schools and public safety. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

While voters across the nation were glued to their screens last night counting electoral votes, the higher education community was holding its breath awaiting the answers on a number of important ballot initiatives, proving this year’s election was truly about more than blue and red for higher ed.

With the 2012 election only weeks away, Pres. Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney are furiously campaigning for that segment of undecided voters that could make or break their efforts.

At the top of nearly every list of voter concerns this year, of course, is the economy. And because one of the keys to growing the economy is an educated workforce, voters are anxious to hear where each candidate stands on higher education. For the most part, the discussion centers on two issues—affordability and accountability—and the differences are stark.