Community Colleges

Community college engagement and funding connections

In states where local tax dollars do not directly fund community colleges, schools are actively supporting their communities

Supporting local economic and civic projects is a central part of the mission for community colleges that rely on voter approval for funding.

In Kansas, for example, voters elect the six members of their community college’s board of trustees, which levies taxes to pay for the school’s operating expenses. Residents, however, can challenge the board’s decisions and force a referendum on any tax increase.

Study debunks community college completion myths

Transfer students just as likely to graduate from four-year colleges as direct university entrants

Dozens of reports written over the last four decades have created the generally accepted theory that community college students who transfer to universities graduate at lower rate than do students who start out at four-year institutions.

So when David Monaghan and Paul Attewell, researchers at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, began to analyze those studies to uncover when and why it was happening, they got a surprise: the theory, they determined, is actually a myth.

Study: Stopping out makes it harder to start college again

The more breaks a community college student takes, the less likely he or she is to ever graduate

When life gets in the way, community college students often “stop out,” meaning they put their education on hold with the intention to return and complete a degree. But the more breaks a community college student takes, the less likely he or she is to ever graduate, according to a Florida State University study.

Fostering a college-going culture against the odds

South Texas College's eSTC Campus is a totally self-contained campus where students do everything online

As the founding president of South Texas College, Shirley Reed has had her share of challenges in an area of high poverty with many families, recently immigrated from Mexico, who might only dream of sending a child to college.

Since 1993, Reed and STC have made tremendous inroads on changing that.“The students I see are all motivated, hungry for a better life. More than 70 percent of our students are the first in their families to attend college, meaning they don’t know exactly how to attend college at first, but they know it’s the path to a better future,” she says.

Some South Carolina applicants rejected...and accepted, too

Students may receive automatic acceptance letters to system's two-year campuses

Students who aren’t accepted to the University of South Carolina main campus this spring may still receive some good news with their rejection letters.

Degrees in reverse on the rise in higher ed

Reverse-transfer agreements between four-year colleges and two-year schools are becoming more common

Community colleges have a long tradition of articulation agreements with four-year institutions, ensuring that those who begin at a two-year school can seamlessly transfer. As the college trajectory becomes less standard­—even for students with bachelor-sized goals who begin at the community college level—institutional leaders are creating or adding the reverse transfer option to articulation agreements.

Reverse transfer considerations for colleges and universities

Students' credit hours and grade-point averages should be part of decision to allow reverse transfers

Like most state universities in Michigan, the University of Michigan-Dearborn has entered into several reverse-transfer agreements with community colleges in recent years. In determining whether to activate the reverse-transfer process for a particular student, UM-Dearborn examines several criteria, says Ken Kettenbeil, vice chancellor for external relations. Here’s his checklist of items to consider:

Reverse transfer collaboration opportunities

Two- and four-year institutions can share data for mutual benefits

As more higher ed institutions develop reverse-transfer agreements, these partnerships “offer great opportunities for the institutions to share data” for mutual benefits, says Dennis Day, vice president for student success and engagement at Johnson County Community College in Kansas.

Here are two ways such collaborative information sharing can benefit both two-year and four-year institutions, as well as students:

When including faculty of color, policies aren’t enough

Policies and practices to create diversity exist, but they don’t seem to be functioning sufficiently, study says

Subordinated and marginalized. That’s how faculty of color at community colleges are feeling.

U.S. Navy SEALs: New ops on campus

Some schools go above and beyond the call of duty to promote the educational success of military students

By the time our UB audience reads this, the movie “Captain Phillips,” based on a true story, will be hitting the Hollywood box office. After keeping the crew of his ship safe, Phillips was held hostage on a lifeboat by Somali pirates. In interviews since, the captain reported not knowing that the ship anchored on his horizon carried US Navy SEALs—a team that would ultimately rescue him.

Since their inception after WWII, the U.S. Navy SEALs have intelligently vanquished US enemies.

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