Community Colleges

Study: Stopping out makes it harder to start college again

The more breaks a community college student takes, the less likely he or she is to ever graduate

When life gets in the way, community college students often “stop out,” meaning they put their education on hold with the intention to return and complete a degree. But the more breaks a community college student takes, the less likely he or she is to ever graduate, according to a Florida State University study.

Fostering a college-going culture against the odds

South Texas College's eSTC Campus is a totally self-contained campus where students do everything online

As the founding president of South Texas College, Shirley Reed has had her share of challenges in an area of high poverty with many families, recently immigrated from Mexico, who might only dream of sending a child to college.

Since 1993, Reed and STC have made tremendous inroads on changing that.“The students I see are all motivated, hungry for a better life. More than 70 percent of our students are the first in their families to attend college, meaning they don’t know exactly how to attend college at first, but they know it’s the path to a better future,” she says.

What keeps HR administrators up at night

What tops the list of HR challenges at your college or university? Managing soaring health care costs? Maybe it’s faculty recruitment, succession planning, or shrinking budgets. Below, HR professionals from four different schools, including Maricopa County Community College, share their chief concerns, revealing why it’s getting more difficult to get a good night’s sleep.

Is there a business model for MOOCs?

Cuyahoga Community College is among the increasing number of colleges and universities that are offering MOOCs, but few have crunched the numbers to determine whether these online courses can succeed as a business proposition. Where ROI conversations are happening, they generally aren’t leading to comprehensive analysis. Some institutions, however, are paving the way by analyzing MOOCs' potential as a business model.

Some South Carolina applicants rejected...and accepted, too

Students may receive automatic acceptance letters to system's two-year campuses

Students who aren’t accepted to the University of South Carolina main campus this spring may still receive some good news with their rejection letters.

Degrees in reverse on the rise in higher ed

Reverse-transfer agreements between four-year colleges and two-year schools are becoming more common
Community colleges have a long tradition of articulation agreements with four-year institutions, ensuring that those who begin at a two-year school can seamlessly transfer. As the college trajectory becomes less standard­—even for students with bachelor-sized goals who begin at the community college level—institutional leaders are creating or adding the reverse transfer option to articulation agreements.

Reverse transfer considerations for colleges and universities

Students' credit hours and grade-point averages should be part of decision to allow reverse transfers

Like most state universities in Michigan, the University of Michigan-Dearborn has entered into several reverse-transfer agreements with community colleges in recent years. In determining whether to activate the reverse-transfer process for a particular student, UM-Dearborn examines several criteria, says Ken Kettenbeil, vice chancellor for external relations. Here’s his checklist of items to consider:

Reverse transfer collaboration opportunities

Two- and four-year institutions can share data for mutual benefits

As more higher ed institutions develop reverse-transfer agreements, these partnerships “offer great opportunities for the institutions to share data” for mutual benefits, says Dennis Day, vice president for student success and engagement at Johnson County Community College in Kansas.

Here are two ways such collaborative information sharing can benefit both two-year and four-year institutions, as well as students:

$7M approved for Jefferson Community College learning center and library

The $12.5 million Collaborative Learning Center would be a 41,000-square-foot facility where students would have access to library materials, computers, integrated technology such as Smartboards, counseling, and tutoring.

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President Obama’s college rating plan

On NPR, Judith Scott-Clayton, professor of economics and education at Columbia University’s Teacher College and senior research associate at the Community College Research Center, discusses President Obama's proposal to rank colleges based on performance and affordability.

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