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Teaching & Learning

From UB

University of Hawai’i West O’ahu hires college chancellor

January, 2017
Maenette K.P. Ah Nee-Benham, who's taught higher ed since 1993, was honored as Educator of the Year by The Native Hawaiian Education Association in 2015.

Maenette K.P. Ah Nee-Benham is the new chancellor of the University of Hawai’i West O’ahu. A native Hawaiian, Benham was previously the inaugural dean of the Hawai’inuiakea School of Hawaiian Knowledge at University of Hawai’i Manoa, the only college of indigenous knowledge at a Research I institution in the U.S.

Colleges announce tech trends for 2017

January, 2017
Over half of technology staff respondents say they are more likely to collaborate more closely and frequently with other college departments on issues of practice and policy.

Campus technology leaders report significant new investment to come this year in the area of academic tech tools such as lecture capture, AV equipment and active classroom initiatives. It’s the third year in a row academic technology led the list of top significant investments in a UB survey. 

Proposing a liberal arts and technical education armistice

December, 2016
Bill Path is president of Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology

Despite its sometimes rigid conventions and customs, higher education is still very good at finding innovative solutions to problems that face students. Today’s college graduates are struggling. They need the technical skills to enter the modern workforce and the ability to advance their careers—not one or the other.

AV within IT at a small college

December, 2016

With only 775 students, the need for a dedicated AV department was low at Martin Luther College, a teacher and pastor training institution in southwest Minnesota. The IT department handled the installation and wiring of emergency broadcast systems and of classroom AV technology, including projectors.

But as the school’s music program grew, an AV division created itself within the IT department.

Under the hood of higher ed student information systems

December, 2016
Students at Connecticut College can access its student information system via mobile or desktop.

In today’s world of vast networks and complex data analysis, the student information system is becoming a powerful tool to track—and influence—student success. By looking at the big picture of data generated across an institution’s enterprise resource planning software, universities can begin to forecast student outcomes.

Sponsored Content

1/10/2017

The Jeanne Clery Act, passed in 1990, requires all colleges and universities who receive federal funding to share information about crime on campus and their efforts to improve campus safety, as well as inform the public of crime in or around campus. Revised and amended several times since its inception, compliance with the Clery Act requires careful and deliberate coordination among various campus officials and entities.  

Sponsored by: 
Stanley Security
Joseph Gillio,  Senior Director, Strategic Planning & Marketing,  Casio America Inc.

Traditional projectors operate off of a mercury vapor lamp. Casio’s LampFree projectors use a blue laser, phosphor and a red LED light source. This is a major advantage for several reasons...

Linda Ding, Senior Education Program Strategist, Laserfiche

There are three challenges in achieving efficiencies through technology initiatives.

Eileen Smith,  Vice President Marketing and Communications,  Jenzabar

Previously, students were looked at in a very fragmented way: They were either a recruit, an applicant, a student, a potential graduate, a lifelong learner or potential dropout. New tools have caused a shift in how higher ed is viewing students, we can now think of the student in a much more holistic way.

It’s no secret that text messaging is the preferred method of communication for today’s students over email, direct mail or phone calls; a recent study found that some 97 percent say they use texting as their primary form of communication, 73 percent say they want schools to text them, and nearly three quarters of prospective students want to text with admissions counselors. However, only 28 percent report being offered the option to text with their college or university. How should institutions address this gap by reaching students the way they prefer?