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Sustainability

From UB

Groundbreakings: College science building, business school, learning commons

December, 2017
The science and innovation building at the California State University's Dominguez Hills campus will contain wet and dry labs with bi-folding doors that connect to outside workshops.

California State University's Dominguez Hills campus is set to complete a three-story, 91,000-square-foot building for early 2020.

Higher ed can power peace of mind

November, 2017
Robert Shipley is assistant vice president of Facilities Management and campus sustainability coordinator at Adelphi University in Garden City, N.Y.

Storms like Sandy—and more recently Harvey, Irma and Maria—make us think about our responsibility as the people in charge of the facilities that so many live, work and learn in every day.

Binghamton University builds the Koffman Southern Tier Incubator

October, 2017
SUSTAINABLE SPOTLIGHT—The incubator’s design incorporates natural lighting, and occupancy sensors are used to help save energy. The building location and exterior provide for optimal solar orientation.

Binghamton University has extended its reach to the business sector with the Koffman Southern Tier Incubator, a supportive environment for entrepreneurs and startup companies.

Presidents’ residences

September, 2017
AN INTIMATE, WELCOMING FEEL—Turning the living room of the president’s home at Lycoming College in Pennsylvania into an art gallery cost almost nothing—but sent a big message. President Kent Trachte and his wife, Sharon Trachte, want students to feel welcome in their home, particularly because the college has a tradition of serving first-generation students. The transformation of the living room, used for gatherings, highlights that the Trachtes embrace the liberal arts. The home was built in 1938.

Their form and function may vary, but there’s one trait nearly every president’s residence has in common: It’s much more than just a home.

Does school size matter in game day sustainability?

September, 2017

The trend toward greener game days is most pronounced among the big athletic schools, given their more plentiful resources, says Julian Dautremont-Smith, director of programs for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.

At the same time, colleges where sports are less prominent can still find ways to integrate sustainability into game days.

It’s really about the same strategies of recycling and composting.

Sponsored Content

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