You are here

Software

From UB

Colleges unleash LMS

February, 2017
Most U.S. colleges and universities have an LMS for academic activities, including posting syllabuses, grading and sending out announcements.

Online faculty at Castleton University don’t just dole out tests—they take them, too. Full- and part-time instructors who have no experience teaching online with Moodle’s learning management system work through a self-paced, six-module course created by associate academic dean Cathy Kozlik. 

AV within IT at a small college

December, 2016

With only 775 students, the need for a dedicated AV department was low at Martin Luther College, a teacher and pastor training institution in southwest Minnesota. The IT department handled the installation and wiring of emergency broadcast systems and of classroom AV technology, including projectors.

But as the school’s music program grew, an AV division created itself within the IT department.

What should a college or university consider when looking for a new SIS?

December, 2016

“Look for a system that is very easy to use and easily adopted. I would want to make sure the new SIS could be easily connected to the fundraising system, housing system and admission system. I’d look for the SIS to become the core of our operation and make sure everything can easily be integrated with it.”

—Jack Chen, CIO, Adelphi University

Under the hood of higher ed student information systems

December, 2016
Students at Connecticut College can access its student information system via mobile or desktop.

In today’s world of vast networks and complex data analysis, the student information system is becoming a powerful tool to track—and influence—student success. By looking at the big picture of data generated across an institution’s enterprise resource planning software, universities can begin to forecast student outcomes.

Tech providers on student-success tech deployment snafus

October, 2016

What do you see as the biggest mistake colleges and universities make when implementing student success technology?

“Retention technology can identify potential at-risk students, but then you need success coaches in place to effectively engage students. Helping coaches understand data and apply it proactively instead of reactively will empower them to reach out long before red flags surface.”

Sponsored Content

3/16/2017

In the race to attract, retain and prepare students, the institutions with the most relevant programs and most current technologies have an advantage. Hands-on learning through 3D printing at a college or university opens doors to entrepreneurship and industry collaborations that benefit budding scientists, engineers, artists and designers by preparing them for the requirements of the knowledge-based economy.

Sponsored by: 
3/9/2017

Often, student success efforts are focused primarily on retaining first year students, but fail to continue supporting students throughout their college careers. At the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, the institution’s leadership wanted to take a broader approach to student success by developing a predictive model that would include upperclassmen.

Sponsored by: 
3/7/2017

Students today don’t respond to the traditional methods of communication from their college or university like they once did. While websites and email are appropriate for housing and delivering certain types of information, institutions need to develop a campus-wide mobile presence in order to reach students effectively and in the format they prefer.

Sponsored by: 
2/23/2017

Many institutions struggle with the consequences of using multiple IT platforms for managing operations across departments, such as IT Support, Admissions, HR, Marketing, Residence Life or Facilities. The results—dissatisfied students and faculty, miscommunication, redundancy and poor resource allocation among them—can negatively impact the institution in a variety of ways.

Sponsored by: 
2/21/2017

At the University of Trinidad and Tobago, recording lectures was once a cumbersome technology dance. From loaner cameras and SD cards to burning and distributing DVDs, the process was disconnected from the teaching and learning objectives and produced no measurable results.

The university aligned its efforts by transitioning to an active flipped classroom.

Sponsored by: