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Online learning

From UB

Higher ed with remote reach

February, 2018

As more colleges make dual-enrollment classes available online, new options are emerging for structuring classes, boosting student/teacher interaction and ensuring content rigor. Here are some successful approaches.

Case study: Fox School of Business

February, 2018

At Temple University’s Fox School of Business, students have a menu of options to choose their own MBA path.

“They can do 100 percent online, 100 percent face-to-face, or any mix of online, hybrid, and face-to-face coursework,” says Darin Kapanjie, academic director of Fox’s online and part-time MBA programs.

Higher ed MBA programs flex their muscle

February, 2018
BUSINESS CASE—Part-time MBA students at Fox School of Business at Temple University can divide their time between classrooms and synchronous web sessions. (Temple University Photography).

With the number of traditional MBA students dropping, business schools must get creative to survive and ultimately thrive.

Pop-up higher ed courses respond to events in real time

February, 2018
TIMELY TOPIC—Students analyzed one another’s digital profiles in a pop-up class titled “Thriving in a Digital World” at St. Michael’s College in Vermont. Campus IT members Erik Lightbod and Chris Lei (at podium) taught the free class, which offered students a single credit in fall 2017.

An the last few years, a handful of higher ed institutions have offered multisession “pop-up courses” that faculty can design quickly for students who want to earn credit for studying events in real time.

Autonomous agents of change in higher ed

February, 2018
Charles Isbell, the senior associate dean for Georgia Tech’s College of Computing, will be a UBTech keynote speaker in Las Vegas this June.

Charles Isbell’s research passion is artificial intelligence, or AI. The senior associate dean for Georgia Tech’s College of Computing focuses on building “autonomous agents.”

Sponsored Content

5/10/2018

Predictive analytics can serve as the foundation of student success efforts. By drawing together data from disparate campus sources and systems, predictive analytics software can enable institutional leaders to predict the likelihood of student attrition, identify at-risk students, and match them with the right resources that can help them succeed.

5/2/2018

Today’s students have expectations that their courses provide flexible, easy-to-access video content and blended learning environments, but implementing video such as lecture capture platforms at scale across campus—and in a way that drives student success—can be challenging.

4/19/2018

Student loan debt—as well as delinquency and defaults—continue to be serious concerns among students, alumni, parents, higher ed institutions and their communities. The financial burdens on students can negatively impact both their success while enrolled and after graduation, as well as the enrollment, finances and public image of institutions as a whole.

4/17/2018

Collaborative work is key to a student’s success in the workforce of today and tomorrow. Today’s students expect their campus learning spaces to be technology-enabled environments that provide seamless collaboration and wireless connectivity, but creating these spaces can be challenging for institutions, as there are a variety of issues to consider, from room layout to the “digital divide.”

4/12/2018

Campus mail centers have changed dramatically. Due to the rise of e-commerce, many campuses are overwhelmed with package deliveries, and campus mail centers are struggling to keep pace. This trend is forecast to continue for the foreseeable future, resulting in disgruntled students and wasted resources. Leading institutions have found solutions—innovative technology which enables campus mail centers to become efficient, flexible and responsive to this changing environment.