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Cost-effective alternative

October, 2017

 Crowd-powered captioning Like with crowdfunding, the future of live captioning may be powered by a group.

With professional captionists costing as much as $100 per hour, a lower-cost solution is in the works to allow groups of average typists to provide real-time captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. Legion:Scribe is making that happen.

Quality control in captions

October, 2017

Whether it’s on-site or remote, captions will vary in quality, says Margaret Camp, director of student accessibility services at Clemson University.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) is considered the most accurate level of transcription, which is “utterance-for-utterance,” she says.

The captionist types everything heard. However, this level of accuracy costs twice as much as another form of live captioning, called “meaning-for-meaning.”

Breaking down the roadblocks to live captioning

October, 2017

What roadblocks are colleges coming up against in expanding access for hard-of-hearing students during class and at live events?

“While budgets and regulatory awareness can be roadblocks to accessing university classes and events, technology is the greatest challenge to delivering live captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

Targeted texts can boost college enrollment

September, 2017
TEXT WHAT’S NEXT—Georgia State University’s text messaging program boosted enrollment by reminding incoming students of key deadlines and answering their questions.

Colleges and universities should be texting students—but not everyone, not all the time, and not about everything that’s happening on campus.

UNLV and Chapman University join the hydration station trend

August, 2017
UNLV students worked with mentors provided by Food & Water Watch’s Take Back the Tap campaign to create a matching fund for station installation. (UNLV).

Hydration stations are popping up at several colleges and universities to promote environmental consciousness and healthfulness on campus.

Sponsored Content

10/12/2017

Campus safety has become increasingly complex. Higher ed leaders face the threat of serious safety incidents on their campuses every day, while changing legislative mandates only add to the complexity. Ensuring that safety training and processes are up-to-date can be challenging. As a result, many institutions are adopting more efficient processes and individualized technology solutions that improve campus safety while saving time and money.

Sponsored by: 
9/28/2017

For many institutions, implementing new processes, platforms or solutions in the business office, bursar’s office or financial aid departments can seem intimidating and overwhelming. Besides ensuring that any new process or solution improves efficiency and meets the needs of both students and staff, there are a multitude of other factors to consider, such as security, compliance, logistics, and project timing and prioritization.

Sponsored by: 
9/19/2017

Like most institutions, the University of Arizona added lecture capture technology through small scale experimentation, starting at the departmental level. But in just a few years, lecture capture had taken hold and UA faculty were producing some 2TB of video every week and over 30,000 hours each year. Further complicating the situation was the wide variety of lecture capture systems from different vendors used on campus, each using different appliances and hardware, each providing different capabilities, and each requiring different levels of support. There had to be a better way.

Sponsored by: 
Publication Date: 
9/14/2017
Provided by: 

Learn the innovative ways colleges and universities are addressing the career readiness of their students.

Download the White Paper

Publication Date: 
9/8/2017
Provided by: 

A complete guide to implementing lecture capture, from content considerations to equipment configuration and more.

Download the White Paper