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IoT takes control of colleges

June, 2017
Kelly Walsh is CIO of The College of Westchester in New York.

Growth forecasts suggest tens of billions of devices will be connected as spending exceeds $1 trillion by 2020, according the 2017 NMC Horizons Report for Higher Education.

Colleges go live on social media

May, 2017

The interest in live videos across social media platforms has accelerated over the past few months with a series of developments that bring high-quality video broadcasting to the masses.

The survival checklist for higher ed presidents

May, 2017
Joseph Brennan is vice president of communications and marketing, and clinical professor of business at the University at Albany. Mark Weaver owns Communications Counsel, an Ohio-based firm that advises universities on crisis communications. He teaches at The Ohio State University College of Law, the University of Akron, and the School of Government at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Based on our decades of experience counseling campus CEOs, we’ve identified the key behaviors successful presidents use to lead their institutions through the tough times.

College students and faculty swipe to stay mindful

April, 2017
MOBILE MINDFULNESS—UT Austin higher ed students and faculty using  Thrive at UT can take a few minutes to read daily and weekly gratitude reflections. Interactive quizzes help students apply the concepts to their own lives.

A well-being app encourages students at The University of Texas at Austin to stay in the moment—via the device that often takes them out of it: their phone.

Communication engines on college campus

April, 2017
SOCIAL CONCEPTS—GW’s #social channel on Slack allows social media managers in offices across the college to share ideas.

Higher ed administrators are using apps and platforms behind the scenes to help create efficiencies, increase productivity, and manage projects and workflow.

Sponsored Content

6/28/2017

While students have a variety of options when it comes to paying for college, making unwise financial decisions can lead to negative consequences for the student as well as the institution. Overborrowing, poor planning and budgeting, and misunderstanding financial aid can create seemingly insurmountable debt that can affect academic performance, push students to leave school before completion, and burden them long after graduation.  

Sponsored by: 
6/22/2017

Higher education is in the midst of significant change. Institutions are under pressure to reduce costs and improve the efficiency of operations while providing responsive, quality services to students. Many college and university leaders are turning to transformative technologies such as electronic forms, workflow automation and enterprise content management (ECM) to help them overcome these challenges.

Sponsored by: 

The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington formed a partnership in the summer of 2015 with the Institute of Translational Health Sciences, the University of Washington Medicine Research Information Technology, and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-Pacific Northwest Region.

The partnership sought to create and fund a space on campus that would accelerate health research and innovation by supporting researchers and investigators and allowing a multifaceted approach to research.

Higher education institutions are constantly looking for ways to boost retention rates, especially among students struggling to meet increasing costs. Accepting payments from international students can also be challenging—from dealing with security issues associated with carrying cash to reconciling international wire transfers that may omit the recipient’s name. A cashless attitude is becoming the norm with payment plans, 529 plans and wire transfers being offered as alternatives to cash, checks or credit cards.

Like many institutions, Yale University first adopted academic video at a departmental level. This proved the potential of video as a study aid, but also created a number of challenges, including requiring administrators to maintain a complex web of disconnected media storage solutions, and forcing students to learn multiple systems for accessing their recorded lessons. As video became an increasingly relied-upon pedagogical tool for both online and on-campus learning, it was determined that the university should transition to a unified media platform.