You are here

Libraries

From UB

College students learning online, but stepping on campus

August, 2018
Many online students still have on-campus business, such as meeting with instructors and making payments, according to “Online College Students: Comprehensive Data on Demands and Preferences,” The Learning House Inc. (UBmag.me/demands).

Like their peers on campus, students enrolled in online programs benefit when they feel included in a community. Colleges cater to this population by offering in-person special events and extended office hours.

Libraries and the efficiency of collaboration

August, 2018

We hear it all the time—complaints about the inefficiency of public higher education in Massachusetts. These complaints are often based on the incorrect assumption that providing students with a choice—the choice of where, when, and what to study is necessarily inefficient. How do we provide choice in an efficient way? I’ll answer that from my corner of public higher education.  

Alfred R. Goldstein College Library at the Ringling College of Art and Design

May, 2018
RAINBOWS AND FURNITURE—Bright pops of color identify the library’s program areas, including a room for gaming studies and a 24-hour learning laboratory with computers and Cintiq interactive displays. The furnishings decorating the building were chosen by students who went to a fair hosted by architect Shepley Bulfinch.

The Ringling College of Art and Design’s campus in Sarasota, Florida, has given the Alfred R. Goldstein library its own three-story structure in the heart of the campus.

World of active learning in higher ed

May, 2018
COLLABORATIVE BY DESIGN—The University of Leeds in England redesigned three tiered lecture theaters to new standards that aim to improve collaborative experiences for staff and students. Each booth is embedded with digital technology to facilitate enhanced group work and accommodate flipped learning.

As the trend in active learning classrooms has accelerated internationally, colleges in the U.S. can learn from the cutting-edge classroom design and technology that other countries have built.

How colleges manage inner space

April, 2018
FLEXIBLE LABS—UMass Amherst employs standardization and modularization in its Institute of Applied Sciences, with easily movable furniture and rolling equipment, so multiple research teams can use the same space.

Improving space utilization is a goal on every campus, with data analysis tools and software key to many efforts. Ultimately, there are different cases for different spaces.

Sponsored Content

8/21/2018

The evolution of technology and online learning is enabling institutions to expand access to education across a broader spectrum of learners, by providing learning opportunities outside the limits of time, place or distance.

From left to right: Lisa McIntyre-Hite, Executive Director of Product Innovation, Walden University; Christopher Sessums, Learning Strategies Consultant, D2L

The demographics of today’s higher ed learners are shifting dramatically. Those once considered nontraditional learners—adults looking to change career paths, workers returning to school for certifications or students requiring flexible learning paths—have become the norm.

How must institutions respond to these changing demographics to meet the evolving demands of these ‘new traditional’ students? How can institutions use technology and data to drive student success and to support continuous improvement in this changing environment?

From left to right: Jacqui Spicer, Chief Operating Officer, Baker College; Gus Ortiz, Managed Services Program Manager and Principal Consultant, Jenzabar

Under pressure to contain costs and improve efficiency, many institutions are turning to cloud-based models for their ERP, HR, finance and other crucial systems. Cloud models create more collaborative, interactive environments wherein critical data is more accessible, making more resources available for institutions to better serve students.

From left to right: Jon MacMillan, Senior Data Analyst, Rapid Insight; Charles Ansell, Chief Operating Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Every institution has access to data that can help to drive more effective decision-making; the challenge is that often it resides in silos around campus. By democratizing data access across the institution and building a data-focused campus culture, staff are empowered to make more effective decisions.

University Business (UB) and Polycom collaborated to develop a survey to explore the use of technologies such as video conferencing in higher education. It was deployed to the UB audience on May 11, 2018, and some 213 respondents participated, from a variety of campus departments, and from many different types and sizes of institutions across the country.

Polycom provides video, voice and content sharing solutions that empower educators to deliver the next generation of immersive, collaborative learning experiences.