International

From UB

Pop-up higher ed courses respond to events in real time

February, 2018
TIMELY TOPIC—Students analyzed one another’s digital profiles in a pop-up class titled “Thriving in a Digital World” at St. Michael’s College in Vermont. Campus IT members Erik Lightbod and Chris Lei (at podium) taught the free class, which offered students a single credit in fall 2017.

An the last few years, a handful of higher ed institutions have offered multisession “pop-up courses” that faculty can design quickly for students who want to earn credit for studying events in real time.

Internationals at the college campus career center (or not)

December, 2017
GLOBAL LINKS—Arizona State’s Career and Professional Development Services office organized a virtual career fair to connect students with international employers offering internships and career opportunities abroad.

A recent survey by World Education Services (WES) found that more than 40 percent of current international students had not yet used campus career services.

Web content experts on creating multilingual pages

December, 2017

Why should college administrators consider making part of their website or campus app accessible to speakers of languages other than English, and can you offer any tips for success?

Social media: Going beyond English

December, 2017

Reaching students and families with social media posts in their native language is one way higher ed institutions can build engagement and drive traffic to the website.

Here’s how two universities are getting social using WeChat. 

WeChat captures the biggest share of mobile apps usage in China, according to the 2017 Internet Trends report from Mary Meeker, a venture capitalist and former technology sector securities analyst.

Colleges that are investing in impressions

November, 2017

The investigations into election interference by Russian interests using Facebook and Twitter ads underscores the influence that digital advertising can have on opinions and behaviors.

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Keeping employees engaged while minimizing turnover is a crucial component of institutional success, but unfortunately many colleges and universities are hampered by a culture of disengagement. Recent studies have found that many faculty members and other employees feel they are not engaged with their work. How can higher ed leaders address this common challenge by actively transforming disengagement into engagement, keeping academic faculty and staff members on the job and helping them to support student and institutional success?