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From scattered to scale–How one large university manages 2TB of new lecture capture video every week

More than a quarter million hours—that’s how much time students at the University of Arizona collectively spent watching recorded lectures, flipped classroom presentations, and other academic video just last year.

Quick, click: Student response systems evolve in higher ed

November, 2016
Equipped for Response—In 2015, more than 600 instructors and 20,000 students used clickers at  The University of Arizona. The Office of Instruction and Assessment’s resources page offers a primer with clicker best practices and strategies, including tips on writing good questions.  Photo: Thomas Veneklasen Photography/Arizona Board of Regents

Colleges and universities have used student response systems for years to take attendance, administer pop quizzes and register informal polls in larger classes where verbal discussions are limited. But as technology improves, student response systems are becoming more versatile than ever—and instructors are increasingly creative in using them.

Are app-based systems a distraction in college classrooms?

November, 2016

“I know the idea of bringing your own device is becoming more prominent, but I still think pulling out a phone, tablet or laptop is distracting. You always lose students for a measurable amount of time, and that’s the primary concern.”

Dwight Farris, instructional technologist, The University of Arizona

Active teaching in a traditional lecture hall

October, 2016
High-capacity classrooms: The collaborative BioSciences West classroom at The University of Arizona holds up to 112 students.

Active learning should allow students in traditional lecture halls to work in small groups solving problem sets or developing presentations. That can be accomplished without renovating the space, but the layout does present challenges.

Lecture courses can be made more interactive by breaking up class time with small-group activities.

Interactive lecture halls enhance higher ed

October, 2016
UNC-Chapel Hill’s Center for Faculty Excellence has experimented with alternative classroom designs that make it easier for instructors to use interactive learning methods—including in lecture hall-sized spaces.

Students enrolled in media ethics at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill this fall walked into a lecture hall that looked radically different than two years ago. Gone is the stadium-style seating. Now the room, used for a wide range of courses, has 100 rolling swivel chairs with adjustable tables and nine mounted video screens.

Sponsored Content

4/20/2017

Like many institutions, Yale University first adopted academic video at a departmental level. This proved the potential of video as a study aid, but also created a number of challenges, including requiring administrators to maintain a complex web of disconnected media storage solutions, and forcing students to learn multiple systems for accessing their recorded lessons. As video became an increasingly relied-upon pedagogical tool for both online and on-campus learning, it was determined that the university should transition to a unified media platform.

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3/16/2017

In the race to attract, retain and prepare students, the institutions with the most relevant programs and most current technologies have an advantage. Hands-on learning through 3D printing at a college or university opens doors to entrepreneurship and industry collaborations that benefit budding scientists, engineers, artists and designers by preparing them for the requirements of the knowledge-based economy.

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3/9/2017

Often, student success efforts are focused primarily on retaining first year students, but fail to continue supporting students throughout their college careers. At the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, the institution’s leadership wanted to take a broader approach to student success by developing a predictive model that would include upperclassmen.

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3/7/2017

Students today don’t respond to the traditional methods of communication from their college or university like they once did. While websites and email are appropriate for housing and delivering certain types of information, institutions need to develop a campus-wide mobile presence in order to reach students effectively and in the format they prefer.

Sponsored by: 
2/23/2017

Many institutions struggle with the consequences of using multiple IT platforms for managing operations across departments, such as IT Support, Admissions, HR, Marketing, Residence Life or Facilities. The results—dissatisfied students and faculty, miscommunication, redundancy and poor resource allocation among them—can negatively impact the institution in a variety of ways.

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