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From UB

Military surplus again available to college campus police

November, 2017
Value of military equipment  acquired by colleges. (Source:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions this summer revived the surplus 1033 program, which the Obama Administration had restricted over public concerns about the militarization of police.

From scattered to scale–How one large university manages 2TB of new lecture capture video every week

More than a quarter million hours—that’s how much time students at the University of Arizona collectively spent watching recorded lectures, flipped classroom presentations, and other academic video just last year.

Are app-based systems a distraction in college classrooms?

November, 2016

“I know the idea of bringing your own device is becoming more prominent, but I still think pulling out a phone, tablet or laptop is distracting. You always lose students for a measurable amount of time, and that’s the primary concern.”

Dwight Farris, instructional technologist, The University of Arizona

Quick, click: Student response systems evolve in higher ed

November, 2016
Equipped for Response—In 2015, more than 600 instructors and 20,000 students used clickers at  The University of Arizona. The Office of Instruction and Assessment’s resources page offers a primer with clicker best practices and strategies, including tips on writing good questions.  Photo: Thomas Veneklasen Photography/Arizona Board of Regents

Colleges and universities have used student response systems for years to take attendance, administer pop quizzes and register informal polls in larger classes where verbal discussions are limited. But as technology improves, student response systems are becoming more versatile than ever—and instructors are increasingly creative in using them.

Active teaching in a traditional lecture hall

October, 2016
High-capacity classrooms: The collaborative BioSciences West classroom at The University of Arizona holds up to 112 students.

Active learning should allow students in traditional lecture halls to work in small groups solving problem sets or developing presentations. That can be accomplished without renovating the space, but the layout does present challenges.

Lecture courses can be made more interactive by breaking up class time with small-group activities.

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Delivering online learning has become crucial to satisfying the learning demands of nontraditional learners—who are quickly becoming considered “new traditional” learners. Meeting these evolving demands is a moving target for institutions, and as a result, there are a variety of important considerations that are vital to building an online learning program that succeeds both today and in the future.


Conducting meaningful conversations with stakeholders is vital to inform and validate the strategic direction of any institution. However, many traditional methods of gathering this input—such as surveys or town hall meetings—are flawed and can be misleading, often being disproportionately influenced by the loudest or most negative voices.


The costs of higher education continue to challenge students, while the pressure to reduce administrative overhead and improve efficiency is constant for institutions and their executive leaders. Taking the right approach to student payment plans is one way to address both of these concerns.

When Texas Tech University needed to replace the energy-inefficient windows of its multistory Weymouth Hall student residence last summer, time was indeed of the essence.

Needing to ensure the building’s vacancy during the demolition and installation process, you could say the university had a narrow window of opportunity.

But thanks to the ezIQC® construction procurement method through Gordian and National Joint Powers Alliance®, the $1.7 million project was completed on schedule with top-quality products and services.

Thousands of students, faculty, staff and alumni visit the Student Union at Oklahoma State University each day and take advantage of a large number of available retail services. For Mitch Kilcrease, who is assistant vice president and director of the Student Union, something was missing: a printing and parcel shop.

“I felt there was potential on campus to grow a print-service model from a retail base,” Kilcrease says. “A lot of people were already going off-campus to FedEx Office and using its services.”