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Food Service

From UB

Feeding campus—sustainabily—from a container

December, 2016
Students Kylie Campanelli and Chad Marvin operate a hydroponic lettuce farm that lives inside an upcycled, 40-by-8-foot shipping container at Stony Brook University in New York.

Designed by the company Freight Farms, the hydroponic lettuce farm inside a shipping container at Stony Brook University in New York uses 90 percent less water than traditional growing methods to provide an acre’s worth of leafy greens to campus dining halls.

Students use farm-management technologies such as cloud-synced growth data and a smartphone app to control lighting.

Food Franchise 101 on campus

December, 2016
Low price points, brand familiarity and flexible serving hours are why students appreciate having national quick-serve chains such as Au Bon Pain on campus, but institutions can benefit as well.

After years of working with multiple food service vendors and local restaurants, Carnegie Mellon University brought fast-casual bakery chain Au Bon Pain to campus. The school’s first experience with a national restaurant franchise, it was a 12-month process from the brainstorming phase to opening the doors to hungry students.

Campus food service gives back

November, 2016
VISION REALIZED—The student founders of Christopher Newport University’s Food Fighters program graduated in 2014, but their idea for making use of uneaten dining hall food lives on. Partner organizations receive healthy foods that are difficult and expensive for homeless shelters to obtain.

When a trio of students at Christopher Newport University in Virginia wanted to start a program to collect leftover food from the dining halls each night and deliver it to a rescue mission, the director of the university’s dining services had some questions.

Tying food-service outreach to the larger campus community

Drumming up support for a program where food service gives back can involve highlighting a prominent, well-loved individual within campus dining.

Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College in Minnesota, for example, named a food pantry after the school’s first housing director, Bruce Carlson, who died unexpectedly in 2010.

How to reduce campus food waste

October, 2016
Student-run campus organizations are partnering with food service providers to get leftover food to those who need it. (Photo: Food Recovery Network/James Souder, UMD Recovery)

More than 22 million pounds of uneaten food is thrown away on college campuses each year, according to Food Recovery Network, a student-driven nonprofit dedicated to reducing food waste and hunger at higher education institutions.

A single college student generates an average 142 pounds of food waste per year, according to Recycling Works, a Massachusetts recycling assistance program.

Sponsored Content

3/9/2017

Often, student success efforts are focused primarily on retaining first year students, but fail to continue supporting students throughout their college careers. At the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, the institution’s leadership wanted to take a broader approach to student success by developing a predictive model that would include upperclassmen.

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3/7/2017

Students today don’t respond to the traditional methods of communication from their college or university like they once did. While websites and email are appropriate for housing and delivering certain types of information, institutions need to develop a campus-wide mobile presence in order to reach students effectively and in the format they prefer.

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2/23/2017

Many institutions struggle with the consequences of using multiple IT platforms for managing operations across departments, such as IT Support, Admissions, HR, Marketing, Residence Life or Facilities. The results—dissatisfied students and faculty, miscommunication, redundancy and poor resource allocation among them—can negatively impact the institution in a variety of ways.

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2/21/2017

At the University of Trinidad and Tobago, recording lectures was once a cumbersome technology dance. From loaner cameras and SD cards to burning and distributing DVDs, the process was disconnected from the teaching and learning objectives and produced no measurable results.

The university aligned its efforts by transitioning to an active flipped classroom.

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2/16/2017

Students today have varying needs and expectations when it comes to banking as well as receiving funds like financial aid disbursements. And with the evolving needs of millennials it’s difficult to ensure all your students’ needs are being met, especially those who may not be able to or wish not to bank with traditional financial institutions.

Attend this web seminar to participate in a discussion about the unique challenges associated with financial aid credit balance disbursement that millennials face, and how you can adapt to solve those challenges at your institution.

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