Enrollment Management

From UB

Community colleges extend international invitations

August, 2018
A GLOBAL COMMUNITY—With a 680-acre campus in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Kirkwood Community College has attracted students from 100 countries. Its most active recruitment efforts over the past decade have been in Vietnam. Messaging includes small class sizes, affordable tuition and transfer opportunities.

Here are five actions two-year institutions can take to recruit international students.

A simple math solution for a complex higher ed enrollment program

August, 2018
 Michael A. Cioce is president of Rowan College at Burlington County.

We have actually reduced costs for students with a path to a bachelor’s degree that costs about $25,000—less than what most universities charge for a single year.

Getting higher ed prospect students closer to ‘yes’

July, 2018

Here are some ways to cut through the clutter and close the deal with a certain type of prospective students who are fondly called “stealth” applicants.

Enrollment encouragement: Oregon State University’s Beaver Box o’ Swag

July, 2018

Aim: To boost enrollment of the top 1 percent of high school students who qualify for Oregon State’s Presidential Scholarship, admissions officers treat academic standouts like blue-chip athletes.

The program began three years ago.


Link to main story: Colleges should always woo would-be students

Colleges should always woo would-be students

July, 2018
WELCOME ABOARD—During on-campus events for admitted students, current George Mason University students are on hand to help make peer connections as part of the wooing process.

Led by admissions offices, higher ed institutions are enticing accepted students to officially enroll by using innovative communication approaches, developing peer connections and making students feel as if they are already part of the family.

Sponsored Content

11/7/2018

Actively managed payment plans offer a variety of benefits for institutions, by reducing administrative requirements, streamlining processes and improving security and visibility. These plans also support student success by increasing affordability, access and convenience for students.

11/1/2018

While higher education is undergoing seismic shifts, many institutions struggle with the limitations of legacy systems and outdated technologies. To explore some of these issues, University Business has conducted a subscriber survey about how colleges and universities are using core business systems including the ERP, SIS, Finance and HR, and the challenges that legacy systems can create.

Wake Forest University’s Information Systems Multimedia Technician Preston Neill understands the short life span of cables and adapters. With Ditto wireless presentation software installed throughout campus, those unreliable connectors are one step closer to extinction.

“Our goal is to ultimately stop supplying cables and adapters, because cables go missing and adapters break,” Neill says. “The cost to replace them, plus the manpower involved, is what we’re looking to avoid by having a wireless solution. We’re already getting fewer calls with Ditto.” 

From left to right: Robert Ruiz, Vice President of Strategic Enrollment, Liaison International; Larry Boles, Professor and Program Director, University of the Pacific; Julie Masterson, Associate Provost, Dean of the Graduate College and Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Missouri State University

By 2025, graduate enrollment is on track to grow by 3.5 million students. Finding a best-fit student is difficult enough without having to sort through an overabundance of data. Worse, using the wrong data leads to an ineffective recruitment approach, wasting time and resources.

In this webcast, admissions experts explain how to classify your typical candidate, examine applicant data and implement the strategies that will lead to enrollment success.

Speakers

Robert Ruiz
Vice President of Strategic Enrollment
Liaison International

Who is today’s college student?

A new student is emerging. Fewer than half of today’s students fit into the 18- to 22-year-old demographic—now they are 18 to 80. Many students work part time or full time, or have families. They are digital natives. Ninety percent of them have smartphones and half have access to tablets 24/7. Just as when they shop, bank, travel or go out to eat, they have high expectations for higher ed. Many students need online course options. Colleges and universities need to change to meet these expectations in order to thrive.