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e-Procurement

From UB

Managing rogue spending at a small institution

April, 2018

Rogue spending—buying outside a purchasing contract—can be an issue at colleges large and small. Here’s how the small college pros rein it in.

Help spenders put a face to your name. This is easier at smaller colleges, says Karen Khattari, director of general services and procurement at Cedar Crest College. “Everybody knows me, and I know them.” That leads to more control and better accountability.

A different kind of consortium

April, 2018

While many regional consortia use the collective power of members to negotiate purchasing contracts with volume discounts, it can pay to think beyond neighboring colleges when looking at this cost-saving solution.

That’s what the 19 members of the LAMP Consortium did when they joined colleges from around the country to get affordable access to Sakai, a popular open-source learning management system.

Buying strong at small colleges

April, 2018
REMOTE BUYS—Rural institutions such as Colgate University may have added purchasing woes because of supplier delivery challenges.

These purchasing managers work to save their institutions time and money through a range of strategies that result in purchasing power and wisdom from higher ed peers. Here’s how to do the same.

Colleges use event management systems for any event

November, 2017
IT TAKES A CAMPUS—Planning Vanderbilt University’s annual Founder’s Walk—where incoming students are welcomed by fellow students, faculty and staff—requires the coordination of multiple campus departments, including admissions and the registrar.

Event management systems have given schools greater control over everything from booking spaces to ordering food, linens and equipment.

Colleges tackle budget pruning

November, 2017
Lawrence University in Wisconsin cut costs by switching from a subscription to a pay-per-article model on some scientific journals in the library.

Thinking beyond painfully slashing big line items, higher ed leaders can realize significant savings in finding smaller cuts that, all together, add up to make a huge impact.

Sponsored Content

8/21/2018

The evolution of technology and online learning is enabling institutions to expand access to education across a broader spectrum of learners, by providing learning opportunities outside the limits of time, place or distance.

From left to right: Jon MacMillan, Senior Data Analyst, Rapid Insight; Charles Ansell, Chief Operating Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Every institution has access to data that can help to drive more effective decision-making; the challenge is that often it resides in silos around campus. By democratizing data access across the institution and building a data-focused campus culture, staff are empowered to make more effective decisions.

From left to right: Lisa McIntyre-Hite, Executive Director of Product Innovation, Walden University; Christopher Sessums, Learning Strategies Consultant, D2L

The demographics of today’s higher ed learners are shifting dramatically. Those once considered nontraditional learners—adults looking to change career paths, workers returning to school for certifications or students requiring flexible learning paths—have become the norm.

How must institutions respond to these changing demographics to meet the evolving demands of these ‘new traditional’ students? How can institutions use technology and data to drive student success and to support continuous improvement in this changing environment?

From left to right: Jacqui Spicer, Chief Operating Officer, Baker College; Gus Ortiz, Managed Services Program Manager and Principal Consultant, Jenzabar

Under pressure to contain costs and improve efficiency, many institutions are turning to cloud-based models for their ERP, HR, finance and other crucial systems. Cloud models create more collaborative, interactive environments wherein critical data is more accessible, making more resources available for institutions to better serve students.

From left to right: Jon MacMillan, Senior Data Analyst, Rapid Insight; Charles Ansell, Chief Operating Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Every institution has access to data that can help to drive more effective decision-making; the challenge is that often it resides in silos around campus. By democratizing data access across the institution and building a data-focused campus culture, staff are empowered to make more effective decisions.