You are here

e-Procurement

From UB

Colleges use event management systems for any event

November, 2017
IT TAKES A CAMPUS—Planning Vanderbilt University’s annual Founder’s Walk—where incoming students are welcomed by fellow students, faculty and staff—requires the coordination of multiple campus departments, including admissions and the registrar.

Event management systems have given schools greater control over everything from booking spaces to ordering food, linens and equipment.

Colleges tackle budget pruning

November, 2017
Lawrence University in Wisconsin cut costs by switching from a subscription to a pay-per-article model on some scientific journals in the library.

Thinking beyond painfully slashing big line items, higher ed leaders can realize significant savings in finding smaller cuts that, all together, add up to make a huge impact.

Let the numbers do the talking in higher ed spending

March, 2017
A six-step process is required for spend analytics technology to effectively analyze higher ed data.

Campus discussions about spend analytics might sound like a late night infomercial: Implement the technology and save millions!

Products making a difference on campuses nationwide

January, 2016

The editors of UB magazine proudly present the 2016 Readers’ Choice Top Products, chosen from hundreds of nominations. This annual award programs alerts higher ed administrators and staff to the best products their peers use to achieve excellence at institutions throughout the country.

You—the nation’s higher ed leaders—submitted testimonials throughout 2015. Our editorial board carefully narrowed the list based on the quality and quantity of these testimonies.

Higher ed procurement co-ops branch out

May, 2014
Who's buying what?

When it became clear that the scientific equipment in hundreds of labs across the University of Pittsburgh campus was not being maintained effectively, professionals in the university procurement department began looking for a new provider to do the job.

Sponsored Content

The next generation of college students—Generation Z—has a variety of different expectations for higher education, particularly when it comes to the campus environment. Research has also indicated that Gen Z students have higher levels of anxiety and stress both entering and during college, which can significantly impact their likelihood of success.

Community, faculty and student engagement are important components of college and university strategic and facility planning. But many traditional methods of gauging opinion or gathering input—such as surveys or town hall meetings—are flawed and can be misleading, often being disproportionately influenced by the loudest or most negative voices. 

What can institutions do to ensure active engagement from search committee members?

The key to an effective search committee is a high level of engagement, where the committee develops a clear sense of “ownership” of the search process, of the committee’s work and of achieving a successful outcome. Engagement and ownership flow naturally from an institution’s commitment to shared governance and a trust that the search committee will be regarded as a genuine partner throughout the process; they are encouraged at each step along the way.

From early alert programs to degree paths, current student success initiatives often focus solely on academics. But many students leave without completing their degrees due to issues outside of academics. Any institution’s approach to student success must be inclusive of both academic and non-academic issues.