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Dining Halls

From UB

University of Colorado, Boulder builds the Village Center

August, 2017
DINING AND MORE—The new Village Center has been designed around nutrition and sustainability. It’s the only dining center on the CU Boulder campus that doesn’t have deep-fat fryers, and students can blend their own smoothies by hopping on a blender bike and pedaling.

The new Village Center at CU Boulder offers those students multiple dining options, study and collaboration spaces, conference amenities, and a health clinic.

BU dining gets greener

June, 2017
GREEN LIGHT FOR SUSTAINABILITY—Seven restaurants at BU are green certified, including Loose Leafs in the Union Court.

Boston University has seven certified restaurants (more than any other college or university) and the GRA has verified the institution has the greenest food court in the nation.

The campus card factory: Time for a new business model

May, 2017

Most higher ed institutions have issued plastic campus cards for decades based on a 30-year business model. Perhaps it’s time for administrators to review this process in light of current technology and dramatic shifts in generational expectations.

Booting the gluten from an entire college dining hall

April, 2017
SAFE ZONE—Kent State higher ed students with gluten intolerance need not worry when eating at Prentice Café, since the entire facility is gluten-free.

The number of U.S. colleges offering gluten-free dining options is rising, as more people learn about the seriousness of celiac disease, says Chris Rich, vice president of development for the Gluten Intolerance Group.

Colleges go all in for food allergy safety

April, 2017

Colleges and universities taking extra care to improve the safety and quality of life for students with food allergies can participate in the Food Allergy Research & Education’s College Food Allergy Program, which launched in 2014.

In 2015, FARE chose 12 colleges nationwide to participate in a pilot program, and in 2016 the organization announced the expansion of the program to 23 additional institutions.

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