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Dining Halls

From UB

Tying food-service outreach to the larger campus community

Drumming up support for a program where food service gives back can involve highlighting a prominent, well-loved individual within campus dining.

Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College in Minnesota, for example, named a food pantry after the school’s first housing director, Bruce Carlson, who died unexpectedly in 2010.

Campus food service gives back

November, 2016
VISION REALIZED—The student founders of Christopher Newport University’s Food Fighters program graduated in 2014, but their idea for making use of uneaten dining hall food lives on. Partner organizations receive healthy foods that are difficult and expensive for homeless shelters to obtain.

When a trio of students at Christopher Newport University in Virginia wanted to start a program to collect leftover food from the dining halls each night and deliver it to a rescue mission, the director of the university’s dining services had some questions.

The meal deal: Higher ed dining

December, 2015
Behind the scenes at the University of Vermont, chefs work with dining  program administrators to deliver student-requested items in a cost-effective manner. This can involve partnering with local food providers.

Colleges and universities that provide fresh, high-quality food do more than please students—offering good food is also good business. Here are several ways dining program leaders can increase satisfaction and meal plan participation while keeping operating costs stable.

Dining providers on meal plan trends and missteps

December, 2015
Students, faculty and staff at the University of Vermont can eat foods prepared in the certified kosher kitchen, which is operated by Vermont Kosher LLC. In addition, a line of kosher grocery items is available for purchase.

What do you see as the biggest trend in meal plan design?

Colleges dig into sustainable dining

May, 2015
Hyperlocal food service: UMass Amherst Chef Don Sabola selects cherry tomatoes with Joe Czajkowski, owner and operator of Czajkowski Farms, which is less than two miles from campus. The university is set to invest more than $3 million in locally grown food annually.

A pair of draft horses often plows the campus farm at Sterling College. Sterling does have tractors—its agriculture students have to learn how to use all varieties of equipment—but the energy-saving horses are just one step in the Vermont school’s extensive and award-winning sustainable dining program.

The farm produces about 20 percent of the food consumed in the college’s dining hall.

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Given the current environment in higher ed, the pressure to contain costs and the need to justify expenses, it is more critical than ever that any technology investment not only meet the needs of staff, students and the institution, but also provide a clear return on investment. When it comes to the significant investment involved with implementing an ERP, there are strategies and approaches that any institution can take to reduce total cost of ownership, as well as realize ROI in the least amount of time possible.

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Video walls can make a big impression on a university campus, conveying an image of a school on the cutting edge of technology while providing ancillary benefits as teaching aids, wayfinding signage or more. Seven questions can guide a successful video wall installation plan:.