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Commerce

From UB

Campus commerce: Bricks vs. clicks

September, 2018
SPOOKY SAVINGS—The Colgate Bookstore’s June 2018 Customer Appreciation Day, held on Friday the 13th (known as Colgate Day), featured a storewide 13 percent off sale. It’s just one way the store helps honor university traditions.

How can college retail leaders compete with e-commerce? It’s time to get back to basics. Here are five strategies for staying relevant.

Campus store benchmarks: Location, size and services compared

September, 2018

Here’s the rundown for Colgate University, San Diego State University, Clayton State University, Columbus State Community College, Seward County Community College and California State University, Long Beach.

A different kind of consortium

April, 2018

While many regional consortia use the collective power of members to negotiate purchasing contracts with volume discounts, it can pay to think beyond neighboring colleges when looking at this cost-saving solution.

That’s what the 19 members of the LAMP Consortium did when they joined colleges from around the country to get affordable access to Sakai, a popular open-source learning management system.

Managing rogue spending at a small institution

April, 2018

Rogue spending—buying outside a purchasing contract—can be an issue at colleges large and small. Here’s how the small college pros rein it in.

Help spenders put a face to your name. This is easier at smaller colleges, says Karen Khattari, director of general services and procurement at Cedar Crest College. “Everybody knows me, and I know them.” That leads to more control and better accountability.

Keys to success with campus store promotions

May, 2018

What is the biggest key to success with campus store promotions, and what is the biggest challenge in executing them?

Sponsored Content

11/7/2018

Actively managed payment plans offer a variety of benefits for institutions, by reducing administrative requirements, streamlining processes and improving security and visibility. These plans also support student success by increasing affordability, access and convenience for students.

11/1/2018

While higher education is undergoing seismic shifts, many institutions struggle with the limitations of legacy systems and outdated technologies. To explore some of these issues, University Business has conducted a subscriber survey about how colleges and universities are using core business systems including the ERP, SIS, Finance and HR, and the challenges that legacy systems can create.

Wake Forest University’s Information Systems Multimedia Technician Preston Neill understands the short life span of cables and adapters. With Ditto wireless presentation software installed throughout campus, those unreliable connectors are one step closer to extinction.

“Our goal is to ultimately stop supplying cables and adapters, because cables go missing and adapters break,” Neill says. “The cost to replace them, plus the manpower involved, is what we’re looking to avoid by having a wireless solution. We’re already getting fewer calls with Ditto.” 

From left to right: Robert Ruiz, Vice President of Strategic Enrollment, Liaison International; Larry Boles, Professor and Program Director, University of the Pacific; Julie Masterson, Associate Provost, Dean of the Graduate College and Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Missouri State University

By 2025, graduate enrollment is on track to grow by 3.5 million students. Finding a best-fit student is difficult enough without having to sort through an overabundance of data. Worse, using the wrong data leads to an ineffective recruitment approach, wasting time and resources.

In this webcast, admissions experts explain how to classify your typical candidate, examine applicant data and implement the strategies that will lead to enrollment success.

Speakers

Robert Ruiz
Vice President of Strategic Enrollment
Liaison International

Who is today’s college student?

A new student is emerging. Fewer than half of today’s students fit into the 18- to 22-year-old demographic—now they are 18 to 80. Many students work part time or full time, or have families. They are digital natives. Ninety percent of them have smartphones and half have access to tablets 24/7. Just as when they shop, bank, travel or go out to eat, they have high expectations for higher ed. Many students need online course options. Colleges and universities need to change to meet these expectations in order to thrive.