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From UB

Proposing a liberal arts and technical education armistice

December, 2016
Bill Path is president of Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology

Despite its sometimes rigid conventions and customs, higher education is still very good at finding innovative solutions to problems that face students. Today’s college graduates are struggling. They need the technical skills to enter the modern workforce and the ability to advance their careers—not one or the other.

Under the hood of higher ed student information systems

December, 2016
Students at Connecticut College can access its student information system via mobile or desktop.

In today’s world of vast networks and complex data analysis, the student information system is becoming a powerful tool to track—and influence—student success. By looking at the big picture of data generated across an institution’s enterprise resource planning software, universities can begin to forecast student outcomes.

OER revolution in higher ed

December, 2016
The University of Maryland’s open source textbook initiative, known as “MOST,” has guided faculty through more than 50 OER adoptions. The program helps instructors assemble resources to significantly keep down the cost of course materials.

Open educational resources have grown over the last few years from one-off oddities in single courses to the basis of entire degree programs. Cutting out textbook costs for students tops the list of reasons administrators encourage faculty to develop and adopt these free—or very inexpensive—resources, also known as OER.

Quick, click: Student response systems evolve in higher ed

November, 2016
Equipped for Response—In 2015, more than 600 instructors and 20,000 students used clickers at  The University of Arizona. The Office of Instruction and Assessment’s resources page offers a primer with clicker best practices and strategies, including tips on writing good questions.  Photo: Thomas Veneklasen Photography/Arizona Board of Regents

Colleges and universities have used student response systems for years to take attendance, administer pop quizzes and register informal polls in larger classes where verbal discussions are limited. But as technology improves, student response systems are becoming more versatile than ever—and instructors are increasingly creative in using them.

Active teaching in a traditional lecture hall

October, 2016
High-capacity classrooms: The collaborative BioSciences West classroom at The University of Arizona holds up to 112 students.

Active learning should allow students in traditional lecture halls to work in small groups solving problem sets or developing presentations. That can be accomplished without renovating the space, but the layout does present challenges.

Lecture courses can be made more interactive by breaking up class time with small-group activities.

Sponsored Content

3/9/2017

Often, student success efforts are focused primarily on retaining first year students, but fail to continue supporting students throughout their college careers. At the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, the institution’s leadership wanted to take a broader approach to student success by developing a predictive model that would include upperclassmen.

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3/7/2017

Students today don’t respond to the traditional methods of communication from their college or university like they once did. While websites and email are appropriate for housing and delivering certain types of information, institutions need to develop a campus-wide mobile presence in order to reach students effectively and in the format they prefer.

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2/23/2017

Many institutions struggle with the consequences of using multiple IT platforms for managing operations across departments, such as IT Support, Admissions, HR, Marketing, Residence Life or Facilities. The results—dissatisfied students and faculty, miscommunication, redundancy and poor resource allocation among them—can negatively impact the institution in a variety of ways.

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2/21/2017

At the University of Trinidad and Tobago, recording lectures was once a cumbersome technology dance. From loaner cameras and SD cards to burning and distributing DVDs, the process was disconnected from the teaching and learning objectives and produced no measurable results.

The university aligned its efforts by transitioning to an active flipped classroom.

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2/16/2017

Students today have varying needs and expectations when it comes to banking as well as receiving funds like financial aid disbursements. And with the evolving needs of millennials it’s difficult to ensure all your students’ needs are being met, especially those who may not be able to or wish not to bank with traditional financial institutions.

Attend this web seminar to participate in a discussion about the unique challenges associated with financial aid credit balance disbursement that millennials face, and how you can adapt to solve those challenges at your institution.

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