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Beacon facts and campus potential

December, 2018
Here are beacon characteristics and high-potential higher ed uses.

Seven beacon characteristics and nine high-potential higher ed uses—from campus tours to class attendance.

Inside Look: Repurposed buildings for higher ed

November, 2018
When repurposing a post office (circa 1918) into a $9 million residential hall (completed in 2017), Oklahoma State U Institute of Technology kept original skylights, exposed pipes/ductwork, mailboxes, and exposed brick in a tech bar and 11 loft-style apartments. Murals can be found throughout the 76-bed hall—in the 18 flat-style apartments, community kitchen, bathrooms, lobby and lounge. Project manager: KSQ Design; architect: Sikes Abernathie Architects. Melissa Lukenbaugh photo.

In UB’s latest edition of Inside Look, find out how architects maintain the historical integrity of structures when repurposing buildings for higher ed use—while ensuring they provide comfort and the modern conveniences students need.

Higher ed tech developers give K12 teachers new insights

October, 2018
VIEWS YOU CAN USE—A teacher wearing smart glasses (right) can see student information projected in an augmented reality platform (left) developed by Carnegie Mellon University. The hovering icons indicate how students are faring on online assignments and if they need help.

When edtech developers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania asked K12 teachers to wish for a superpower, the teachers imagined student data hovering in midair. Smart glasses can now provide that feedback. 

4 ways colleges are upgrading classroom acoustics

October, 2018
HEAR ME NOW—The Furcolo Hall project at UMass Amherst required transforming a gym space with high ceilings into classrooms. Adding acoustical panel ceilings and upper wall sound-absorbing treatments achieved both the look and results that the project’s acoustical consultants and architect sought. In the active learning classrooms, where multiple people are talking at once and the voices can be distracting, the team worked to mitigate sound buildup.

Sound advice: Do not let acoustic problems linger, recognize that smart classrooms have different acoustic needs, ensure acoustics is considered from the start and be proactive.

Impact of STEM at The University of Arizona

August, 2018

Impact of STEM at The University of Arizona Involvement in the Association of American Universities Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative grew into the UA Learning Initiative.

The initiative includes:


Link to main story: STEM shifts in higher ed

Sponsored Content

From left to right: Ashok Sankar, Director of Solutions Strategy, Splunk; Kara Gillis, Director of Product Marketing, Splunk.

Higher education institutions are challenged with managing their IT systems as they digitally transform their environments. With new technology trends bucking traditional approaches, research shows a general lack of confidence among IT staff and decision-makers. As budgets tighten and IT is increasingly called upon to modernize institutions, IT practitioners need to look at data-driven decision-making strategies.

Nudge theory—using subtle reinforcements to positively influence behavior—is increasingly being implemented in higher education, having been proven to increase FAFSA completions, decrease summer melt and improve retention rates. Tiny “nudges” can result in big changes at any institution.

From left to right: Meghan Turjanica, Product Manager for Student Success, Jenzabar; Mathew Arndt, Lead Data Scientist, Jenzabar; Wade Leuwerke, Associate Professor, Drake University, Co-creator, Jenzabar Student Success Survey.

Many institutions ask their enrollment teams, advising offices, faculty and other departments to focus on student success, but these departments often do not understand all of the unique factors that contribute to the success of their students. A more holistic view is crucial to helping students succeed.

From left to right: Nicole Engelbert, Vice President, Higher Education Development, Oracle; Steve Hahn, Vice Provost for Enrollment Management, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Tonjia S. Coverdale, Ph.D., Vice President, Information Technology and CIO, Central State University (Ohio).

Students are arriving on campus with a rapidly changing set of goals and expectations. Meeting these expectations while supporting student success across the life cycle requires institutional transformation, bold strategies and innovative use of technology. Cloud-based systems can be essential to the transformation, but utilizing this technology effectively requires a strategic approach.

From left to right: Joseph Clay, VP HCM Transformation, Oracle; Pamela Stroko, VP HCM Transformation, Oracle.

With the landscape of higher ed rapidly changing, it is crucial that institutions can compete for top faculty, staff and leadership, who are not only talented people with the right skills, but are also passionate, engaged and mission-driven.