Campus Life

From UB

Community colleges offer more than language training for ESL learners

February, 2018
TEACHER AND LEARNER—A Borough of Manhattan Community College student reads to a child in the college’s Early Childhood Center.

Community colleges are creating developmental tracks, services and on-campus groups to better serve English as second language students and community members.

Colleges design more effective response to hate and bias

February, 2018
CONSTANT PROGRESS—Congressman John Lewis and author Andrew  Aydin give a civil rights lecture sponsored by The University of Maryland, College Park’s Office of Undergraduate Studies, in conjunction with the William L. Thomas ODK Lecture Series and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

An acute rash of hate crimes on America’s campuses has made it necessary for institutions to refine reporting procedures

Jesuit Higher Learning in the 21st Century

February, 2018

Jesuit education in America has a distinguished history that is deeply rooted in faith and intellectual rigor.

Case study: Beacon College (Florida)

December, 2017

Focus of institution 

Students with learning disabilities, ADHD and other emotional challenges who prefer living alone because of anxiety, Tourette’s Syndrome and other conditions

Enrollment 


Link to main story: College roommate not wanted


351 students in 2017-18

Housing developers on the singles housing trend

December, 2017

What are key considerations for administrators when deciding whether to provide more single dorm rooms on campus?”

“Most freshman are in a fragile state during their first year and placing them in a single room can increase the feeling of isolation, leading to lower retention rates. They often need a ready-made roommate/buddy that can help ease the transition.

Sponsored Content

3/8/2018

The costs of higher education continue to challenge students, while the pressure to reduce administrative overhead and improve efficiency is constant for institutions and their executive leaders. Taking the right approach to student payment plans is one way to address both of these concerns.

Colleges and universities have become a favorite target of cybercriminals because of the sheer volume of student information they handle. This is because payment processing happens all over campus, from the ticketing office to the bursar’s office to the cafeteria. In addition to endangering students and damaging the reputation of the institution, the financial costs of a data breach could include legal representation, fines, and the expense of notifying impacted individuals.

How can institutions embrace transparency and flexibility around changing models of revenue and cost mix, student success and graduation rates?  This web seminar outlined some insights into how to meet student, institutional, system and/or political goals in the changing world of higher education. Whether your challenges are within a single institution or across a statewide system, there are a variety of ways in which modern technology can support your journey for future success.

SPEAKER

Sherry Amos

Faced with rising costs of higher education, many students are deciding not to purchase required course materials, therefore going through their semester without the tools they need to learn and succeed. Fifty percent of students say avoiding or delaying these purchases negatively impacts their grades. As a result, more institutions are taking advantage of digital tools and platforms, which provide students and faculty with immersive, engaging content while providing required materials to all students on or before the first day of classes at a lower cost. 

An increasing number of institutions are taking advantage of mobile technology to help recruit, engage and enroll prospective and admitted students. Mobile apps are being used for self-guided campus tours, open houses, recruitment events, college nights and more, providing a highly effective way for admissions and enrollment departments to meet the needs of these students.