Admissions

From UB

Higher ed elevates CTE

December, 2018
CAREER SPARK—California Community Colleges rebranded CTE as “career education” as part of a $6 million campaign. Leaders dropped the word “technical” after surveys indicated it created a misconception among students that programs covered only IT and coding.

How community colleges are rebranding career training to reflect advanced pathways and earnings potential.

College acceptance offers: You’re in—under these conditions

October, 2018
CLEAR GOALS FOR A CLEAR PATH—Students accepted to Kansas State U under conditional admissions work closely with academic coaches during freshman year.

Higher ed institutions tap into the trend of offering conditional admissions—opening up possibilities for less prepared students and maintaining enrollment.

Four-year college plans by student income

October, 2018

For many low-income students, lack of encouragement at home and fear of rejection limits interest in higher ed. Conditional admissions gives these individuals the chance to consider universities they thought were out of their reach.

Math summer camp as B-school prep

September, 2018
EQUATE THIS—A student from Yale School of Management’s Class of 2019 works out an equation during the program’s summer math camp.

Post-grad business schools are identifying opportunities to prep incoming students for the rigorous coursework, particularly as more students are admitted without traditional business backgrounds.

Higher ed’s test-optional movement grows significantly

September, 2018

With studies indicating that test success is relative to family income, high school quality and cultural identity, some schools are turning to other methods, including essays and short videos, to select prospective students.

Sponsored Content

11/7/2018

Actively managed payment plans offer a variety of benefits for institutions, by reducing administrative requirements, streamlining processes and improving security and visibility. These plans also support student success by increasing affordability, access and convenience for students.

11/1/2018

While higher education is undergoing seismic shifts, many institutions struggle with the limitations of legacy systems and outdated technologies. To explore some of these issues, University Business has conducted a subscriber survey about how colleges and universities are using core business systems including the ERP, SIS, Finance and HR, and the challenges that legacy systems can create.

Wake Forest University’s Information Systems Multimedia Technician Preston Neill understands the short life span of cables and adapters. With Ditto wireless presentation software installed throughout campus, those unreliable connectors are one step closer to extinction.

“Our goal is to ultimately stop supplying cables and adapters, because cables go missing and adapters break,” Neill says. “The cost to replace them, plus the manpower involved, is what we’re looking to avoid by having a wireless solution. We’re already getting fewer calls with Ditto.” 

From left to right: Robert Ruiz, Vice President of Strategic Enrollment, Liaison International; Larry Boles, Professor and Program Director, University of the Pacific; Julie Masterson, Associate Provost, Dean of the Graduate College and Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Missouri State University

By 2025, graduate enrollment is on track to grow by 3.5 million students. Finding a best-fit student is difficult enough without having to sort through an overabundance of data. Worse, using the wrong data leads to an ineffective recruitment approach, wasting time and resources.

In this webcast, admissions experts explain how to classify your typical candidate, examine applicant data and implement the strategies that will lead to enrollment success.

Speakers

Robert Ruiz
Vice President of Strategic Enrollment
Liaison International

Who is today’s college student?

A new student is emerging. Fewer than half of today’s students fit into the 18- to 22-year-old demographic—now they are 18 to 80. Many students work part time or full time, or have families. They are digital natives. Ninety percent of them have smartphones and half have access to tablets 24/7. Just as when they shop, bank, travel or go out to eat, they have high expectations for higher ed. Many students need online course options. Colleges and universities need to change to meet these expectations in order to thrive.