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Capital projects and college campus impressions as priorities

January, 2018
2018 construction actions anticipated.

Higher ed leaders love an opportunity to tout the beauty of their campuses, and continuous construction gives them a lot to talk about.

Presidents’ residences

September, 2017
AN INTIMATE, WELCOMING FEEL—Turning the living room of the president’s home at Lycoming College in Pennsylvania into an art gallery cost almost nothing—but sent a big message. President Kent Trachte and his wife, Sharon Trachte, want students to feel welcome in their home, particularly because the college has a tradition of serving first-generation students. The transformation of the living room, used for gatherings, highlights that the Trachtes embrace the liberal arts. The home was built in 1938.

Their form and function may vary, but there’s one trait nearly every president’s residence has in common: It’s much more than just a home.

Therapy animals gain campus acceptance

August, 2016
The Fair Housing Act defines only dormitory accommodations that should be made for therapy pets. (Photo: Gettyimages.com/mssponge)

Pets can help students cope with stress, depression and other mental disorders. But until recently, this well-documented remedy did not guarantee a space for therapy animals on campus.

ADA compliance across campus

July, 2016
At schools such as Quinnipiac University in Connecticut, therapy dogs are brought in during finals week to help manage student stress. It’s an example of “universal design” because those diagnosed with anxiety aren’t the only ones to benefit.

Common oversights can occur even on campuses where leaders believe they have complied with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. To avoid running afoul of the law, constant vigilance and ongoing review are essential because there are so many factors to consider.

9 things to know about ADA compliance on campus

July, 2016
Although some professors prohibit the use of laptops during class because of the distraction factor, laptop use for note-taking is one accommodation colleges may offer students, such as those with a mobility impairment. (Photo: Marist College)
  1. ADA awareness training should be mandatory and ongoing across all departments. If students come to a staff member requesting an accommodation, they should be referred to the disabilities services office, which will help ensure consistency and fairness. 

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