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Wireless Networking

Sharing information on the go is second nature to today’s college student. That reality is pushing higher ed leaders to leverage that connectivity to build a more interactive learning environment. Smartphones, tablets, notebooks, and other mobile devices offer flexibility in extending the learning space beyond the classroom and getting students more engaged.

Protecting any enterprise from security threats can be a daunting endeavor, but few organizational structures are more difficult to secure than a college or university. Students, faculty, administrators and alumni—each group has differing IT needs, creating not just one, but many unique security challenges.

Integrating mobile devices in learning is getting to be old hat in Abilene, Texas.

As early as 2008, Abilene Christian University (ACU) was the first university in the United States to provide each incoming student with an Apple iPhone or iPod Touch. Each of the nearly 4,800 students on the ACU campus located 180 miles west of Dallas can access course calendars, campus maps, receive homework alerts, security alerts, and answer in-class surveys and quizzes, among other ACUdeveloped web applications.

With more than 25,000 students, DePaul University in Chicago is the largest Catholic university in the United States. With 10 colleges divided between two campuses, along with three additional satellite campuses, finding certain pieces of information can be challenging for students.

10 college and university CIOs from a diverse group of institutions around the country joined University Business on July 17 for an online roundtable discussion about bring-your-own-device (BYOD) environments, data security in the mobile age, the biggest challenges they face, and what it takes to create the mobile campus. 

With  smartphones and mobile devices everywhere on campus, students expect complete mobile access to everything from course assignments and grades to events and sports news. This web seminar, originally presented on April 11, 2012, explored how two schools use AT&T Campus Guide, enabling them to keep students and staff connected, informed and engaged while on the go.

Nadir Khan
Education Industry Solutions Consultant
AT&T

As with anything that sounds too good, there’s a catch with 4G. The towers and antennas that provide it require backhaul support, typically leased fiber that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to install. The good news is there is a much cheaper solution available.

Faster than 3G and not range limited like Wi-Fi, 4G is very attractive to campus administrators and technology users alike.

"Students, faculty, and staff expect quick communication wherever they go," says David Morton, director of mobile communications at the University of Washington. Upgrading to 4G is about participating in the expansion of faster broadband mobile coverage and reaping the benefits. Early adopters and experts reveal the benefits campuses with 4G are realizing today and how they are achieving them.

Few students—traditional or nontraditional—complete their work within the 9-5 work day. Rather, libraries and dorm rooms are bustling late into the night with students burning the midnight oil. But, according to findings from the 2012 ACUTA (The Association for Information Communications Technology Professionals in Higher Education) ResNet Survey, only 9 percent of colleges and universities offer 24/7 network support.

Social networking, online banking, entertainment... There’s an app for that—and for everything else you can think of. When it comes to higher ed, there’s an app for that, too. From behind-the-scenes mobile CRM apps to in-your-face athletic program apps, campus administrators are developing ways to make students’, administrators’, and faculty members’ lives a bit easier (or just more fun).

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