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Video Conferencing

Small Animal Hospital

Veterinary students who once huddled together to observe a surgeon's intricate moves now have another learning option at the University of Florida. There, AMX technology allows students near and far to have a bird's eye view of every small step of a procedure.

From left to right: Lisa Brown, Ph.D., Program Manager, eLearning & Innovation, Montana State University; Colin Smith, M.Ed., Senior Manager, Teaching and Learning Technologies, Montana State University.

Research shows that the use of academic video has the potential to dramatically improve teaching and learning. But too often, the use of video on campus is limited to traditional lecture capture, and driving adoption across the institution can be challenging.

This web seminar focused on how to drive video adoption beyond lecture capture, and improve user engagement with higher-quality content. Presenters from Montana State University shared how they adopted a next-generation video platform, improving student engagement and the user experience while gaining buy-in across campus.

From left to right: Christopher Sessums, Learning Strategies Consultant, D2L; Michael Amick, VP of Distance Education, Pima Community College (Ariz.)

The evolution of technology and online learning is enabling institutions to expand access to education across a broader spectrum of learners, by providing learning opportunities outside the limits of time, place or distance. In this web seminar, presenters discussed how to use these tools to expand access to education for more learners at any institution.

University Business (UB) and Polycom collaborated to develop a survey to explore the use of technologies such as video conferencing in higher education. It was deployed to the UB audience on May 11, 2018, and some 213 respondents participated, from a variety of campus departments, and from many different types and sizes of institutions across the country.

Polycom provides video, voice and content sharing solutions that empower educators to deliver the next generation of immersive, collaborative learning experiences.

6/21/2018

Next generation teaching and learning requires new tools and technologies to create more collaborative, interactive environments. Video, voice and content sharing tools are building the active classroom of today and tomorrow. To explore this topic, University Business recently conducted a survey of over 200 higher ed leaders about how their institutions are using some of these tools.

5/2/2018

Today’s students have expectations that their courses provide flexible, easy-to-access video content and blended learning environments, but implementing video such as lecture capture platforms at scale across campus—and in a way that drives student success—can be challenging.

Glenn Jystad, Director of Products, Mondopad

The key thing IT leaders need to keep in mind is not only the awareness that technology has changed, but the reasons why it has changed. Older multimedia equipment was very simple in functionality.

Looking the part: Students at Missouri University of Science & Technology need not venture off campus or even pay anything to find their first professional attire. After a résumé review in the career center, they can jaunt across the hall to the suit closet and emerge career-ready.

Raising awareness of traditional and newer career-preparation services, which thanks to technology can often be delivered remotely, is essential. Career centers are proving, too, that they can create innovative programming to entice participation. Here are several successful approaches worth adopting.

The Institute for Cross Cultural Management at the Florida Institute of Technology trains individuals and organizations to prepare for success in a global environment. Face-to-face communication is a vital part of that work.

Brady Bruce, CMO, InFocus

Unfortunately, technology budgets do not often grow when campuses do. So selections must be made with maximum ROI in mind, from both the usability and support ends.

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