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Social Media

A graduating senior applying for a position completed a successful phone interview and travelled to a face-to-face interview with the company. Instead of an interview, the candidate was told upon arrival that the company had discovered ‘inappropriate’ posts and behavior in his social media. The candidate was directly rebuked and dismissed without any hope of ever obtaining a position in the company.

Yes, this is a true story from a CEO, who had wished they had looked at social media earlier in the process.

Azusa Pacific University in California first used the #iHeartAPU hashtag in 2011 to hype up orientation, where students get T-shirts with the phrase.

Incoming, current and prospective students and alumni were using #iHeartAPU year-round, so a new hashtag—#APUBound—was introduced in 2013. That one is now used to interact with students in the months leading up to orientation.

The students you’re trying to reach today have grown up in a world in which nearly everything was an advertisement. When they were still in diapers they were bombarded with cartoon characters aggressively hawking sugar-laced cereals, and as they’ve grown older, the commercials, emails, texts, pop-ups and social posts crowding their view have only increased in volume.

Colleges and universities with the most Twitter activity are missing out on engaging prospective students via the platform, according to new research from Brandwatch, a social media monitoring and analytics firm.

The analysis used a Thomson Reuters list of the top 10 U.S. university mentions on Twitter from January 31 through March 31. The big finding: The main Twitter handles of these schools were used mostly for broadcasting university-specific and industry news, according to the research.

On April 22, College Republican National Committee chair Alex Smith appeared on a Fox News program to launch the #MyLiberalCampus hashtag campaign. In the same segment, an Eastern Connecticut State University student shared an audio recording of his creative writing professor saying that a Republican Senate win in 2014 would result in college closures, and that Republicans are racist and greedy.

An official University of Kentucky hashtag, #seeblue grew out of a student recruitment campaign tagline launched in 2006.

Joel Bauman is vice president for enrollment management at Stetson University.

Walk into any high school auditorium, mall or fast food restaurant and see Millennials obsessed with their smartphones, tablets and laptops. But are they really that consumed? In a survey conducted by Intel Labs, 61 percent of young adults believe their relationship with technology is dehumanizing. That statistic is clear to many enrollment managers struggling to increase, or even maintain, enrollment.

Karine Joly says digital content is now the currency for search, social networking and even advertising.

What will 2014 bring to the digital field in higher ed? That’s the million dollar question at the start of this new year. Unfortunately, charting a precise course for success over the next 12 months isn’t possible.

When everything changes so quickly, we can only try to identify what looks like the best route to our destination. To help you with the exercise, let’s see what developments are leading the way.

With funding cuts threatening research and other projects, some institutions hoping to promote innovation are following the trend of raising money through social networking.

College presidents are using Twitter to interact with students and faculty.

College presidents, don’t worry—yet—if you only have three Twitter followers.

You don’t need to be a social media superstar right now. In the near future, however, active use of Twitter and Facebook may be a full-blown requirement, according to a study of tweeting in higher ed administration by Dan Zaiontz, a grad student at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.

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