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Networks / Servers

American colleges and universities are breeding grounds for innovative ideas and open information sharing. Pair that with a large number of systems on a given network and a vulnerable student population with fresh credit and you've got an appealing target for identity thieves.

California institution system partners with  AT&T for large-scale network management

Over 16 years ago, the California State University system’s 23 campuses had independently managed networks. Each had autonomy over standards and used a hodgepodge of products.

Many colleges and universities face challenges when it comes to their phone and communications systems. Outdated phone systems offer limited capabilities and often consume time and resources due to support and maintenance requirements. By moving to a unified communications platform, institutions can not only replace aging campus phone systems, but go beyond voice to unify all communications in a streamlined and more reliable desktop application, encompassing voice, email, fax, video and chat.

Addressing the technology needs of today’s students is becoming increasingly challenging, as students expect to have mobile access to any and all learning resources, anytime and anywhere, from any device. These challenges require new IT strategies for institutions; IT managers across campus need to work together with other administrators to address common problems, save money, build relationships and create value for the university.

John Fragola (left) and Peter Grady use iPads to monitor the heat inside Dana English Hall on the Mount Carmel campus at Quinnipiac University. Both are licensed HVAC mechanics in the facilities department.

Members of the facilities crew at Quinnipiac University were spending a lot of time traveling back to their shop during the workday.

This situation, of course, was not unique to Quinnipiac, but department officials at the school set out to eliminate the trips workers had to make to retrieve new work orders, find information about equipment in manuals or look up floor plans. The central Connecticut institution has a 212-acre main campus, and two branches that are a half-mile and about five miles away.

College and university networks present opportunities to manage devices remotely, often automatically. Automating device management via the network saves students, faculty, and staff time and allows institutions to direct resources and efforts to the core business of higher education: learning.

Protecting any enterprise from security threats can be a daunting endeavor, but few organizational structures are more difficult to secure than a college or university. Students, faculty, administrators and alumni—each group has differing IT needs, creating not just one, but many unique security challenges.

Integrating mobile devices in learning is getting to be old hat in Abilene, Texas.

As early as 2008, Abilene Christian University (ACU) was the first university in the United States to provide each incoming student with an Apple iPhone or iPod Touch. Each of the nearly 4,800 students on the ACU campus located 180 miles west of Dallas can access course calendars, campus maps, receive homework alerts, security alerts, and answer in-class surveys and quizzes, among other ACUdeveloped web applications.

When the University of Alberta recently decided to seek Information Technology Infrastructure Library certification, it did so with confidence. It knew it had an ace in the hole: Alcatel-Lucent’s VitalQIP DNS/DHCP IP Address Management solution.

This second of the three-part Connected Campus webinars features a case study from Texas Woman’s University, which used remote management and monitoring systems to achieve significant savings in equipment and energy costs, more efficiently manage staff time and improve the benefits of technology in classrooms and lecture halls.

Jackie Deluna, Strategic Education Marketing, AMX