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From left to right: Patrick Brown, CIO, Illinois College; Marc Benner, Assistant CIO, Illinois College

A robust network might not be needed for your students to participate in basketball, baseball, or football. But what about esports? The leadership of Illinois College recently upgraded their network infrastructure to improve safety and security while also supporting the launch of the college’s highly successful esports program and Gaming Center.

A recent survey found that 59 percent of higher education CIOs believe that digital transformation will lead to significant business model changes, yet many institutions face challenges when it comes to implementing digital strategies for growth. As student demographics and education delivery models evolve, institutions must actively pursue innovative ways to remain competitive.

IT leaders are easing concerns across campus about cloud migration—including security, accessibility and cost.

From left to right: Jon MacMillan, Senior Data Analyst, Rapid Insight; Charles Ansell, Chief Operating Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Every institution has access to data that can help to drive more effective decision-making; the challenge is that often it resides in silos around campus. By democratizing data access across the institution and building a data-focused campus culture, staff are empowered to make more effective decisions.

From left to right: Jacqui Spicer, Chief Operating Officer, Baker College; Gus Ortiz, Managed Services Program Manager and Principal Consultant, Jenzabar

Under pressure to contain costs and improve efficiency, many institutions are turning to cloud-based models for their ERP, HR, finance and other crucial systems. Cloud models create more collaborative, interactive environments wherein critical data is more accessible, making more resources available for institutions to better serve students.

7/24/2018

The next generation of IT infrastructure, hyperconvergence combines computing, storage and networking into a single, simplified and automated system that is far easier and less costly to use and maintain, making it a perfect fit for colleges and universities, which often have limited IT resources but enterprise-level IT needs.

8/3/2017

Higher education is in the midst of significant changes, including in the areas of technology infrastructure and strategy. Moving to the cloud, updating or automating business processes and incorporating data-driven decision making can dramatically benefit the institution, but campus leaders can run the risk of overlooking a crucial component to ensuring any technology strategy is successful: change management.

Research has shown that active learning—asking students to engage in class with each other and their instructor—is more effective than traditional lecturing.

Mike Walters

An institution’s enterprise resource planning (ERP) system drives many of its core processes. ERP software allows students and faculty to access key information, and staff to automate previously manual tasks. It is critical for administrators to make their other programs, such as payment technology systems, integrate seamlessly with the software that governs so much on campus—the ERP.

AMX room controls from Harman provide seamless administrative infrastructure at London university

Administrative flexibility and a seamless user experience were the simple AV system requirements desired by the IT team at London South Bank University. The institution, which serves 18,000 students and is located in the Southwark borough of London, is one of the city’s largest. With 290 classrooms, consistency in AV infrastructure is key for the educators and students who use the rooms, and for the IT staff that manage them.

“Our users are academics,” says Gavin Warnock, ICT infrastructure principle AV engineer at LSBU. “Some are not always comfortable using complex technology.”

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