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IT

2/21/2017

At the University of Trinidad and Tobago, recording lectures was once a cumbersome technology dance. From loaner cameras and SD cards to burning and distributing DVDs, the process was disconnected from the teaching and learning objectives and produced no measurable results.

The university aligned its efforts by transitioning to an active flipped classroom.

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2/23/2017

Many institutions struggle with the consequences of using multiple IT platforms for managing operations across departments, such as IT Support, Admissions, HR, Marketing, Residence Life or Facilities. The results—dissatisfied students and faculty, miscommunication, redundancy and poor resource allocation among them—can negatively impact the institution in a variety of ways.

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Research has shown that active learning—asking students to engage in class with each other and their instructor—is more effective than traditional lecturing.

Mike Walters

An institution’s enterprise resource planning (ERP) system drives many of its core processes. ERP software allows students and faculty to access key information, and staff to automate previously manual tasks. It is critical for administrators to make their other programs, such as payment technology systems, integrate seamlessly with the software that governs so much on campus—the ERP.

AMX room controls from Harman provide seamless administrative infrastructure at London university

Administrative flexibility and a seamless user experience were the simple AV system requirements desired by the IT team at London South Bank University. The institution, which serves 18,000 students and is located in the Southwark borough of London, is one of the city’s largest. With 290 classrooms, consistency in AV infrastructure is key for the educators and students who use the rooms, and for the IT staff that manage them.

“Our users are academics,” says Gavin Warnock, ICT infrastructure principle AV engineer at LSBU. “Some are not always comfortable using complex technology.”

Constructing an impressive welcome center to provide an enhanced environment for new students’ enrollment and orientation activities was a paramount goal for leaders at the University of Houston-Downtown. To facilitate those activities and properly get students acclimated to university life, the welcome center, which will open officially in the spring 2016 semester, was outfitted with top-of-the-line AV equipment.

New Hampshire college partners with GovConnection to fulfill its  mission of equipping teacher candidates with the right technology

The majority of the 500 students in Granite State College’s School of Education are already employed in K12 schools across New Hampshire. 

Nicole Nesrsta

The notion of doing more with less—less budget, less time, fewer resources—has been the mantra in many IT departments for some time. But the institution leaders gathering at this year’s EDUCAUSE Annual Conference are now more concerned with: “How can I do something different to get more value with the resources I have?”

In just three years, enrollment at Lone Star Community College grew by about 50 percent. The six-campus system, located in the north Houston metro area, now has more than 95,000 students and has experienced explosive data growth, as well—from 40 terabytes to 1.6 petabytes.

In today’s 24/7, always-on world, students, faculty and other key stakeholders expect institutions of higher education to be on the cutting edge of technology. As CIO of Western Oregon University (WOU), a vibrant campus of 4,992 undergraduates and 1,066 graduate students with our main campus in Monmouth, I know that when it comes to technology, leading universities must deliver unsurpassed learning capabilities that extend well beyond the classroom.

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