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Many online students still have on-campus business, such as meeting with instructors and making payments, according to “Online College Students: Comprehensive Data on Demands and Preferences,” The Learning House Inc. (UBmag.me/demands).

Like their peers on campus, students enrolled in online programs benefit when they feel included in a community. Colleges cater to this population by offering in-person special events and extended office hours.

What is the biggest challenge administrators have fostering trusting relationships between students and faculty? What’s the most innovative way you’ve seen a college tackle this challenge?

Here are nine places to foster ties among faculty and students.

Kim Tolley is a professor of education at Notre Dame de Namur University and author of In Professors in the Gig Economy (Johns Hopkins, 2018).

In Professors in the Gig Economy, Kim Tolley brings together experts who have been involved with unionization at public and private colleges and universities.

When it comes to professional development and compliance training for faculty, staff and student employees, many institutions rely on a large number of siloed, separate systems. By moving to a central, shared learning platform, institutions are able to track and report on the progress of training, plan better for the future, and more effectively meet business needs across departments.

3/28/2018

Conducting meaningful conversations with stakeholders is vital to inform and validate the strategic direction of any institution. However, many traditional methods of gathering this input—such as surveys or town hall meetings—are flawed and can be misleading, often being disproportionately influenced by the loudest or most negative voices.

Higher education needs to focus on employee development and start rebuilding their own farm systems. Why do so many colleges look externally for new talent instead of developing their employees? 

James Muyskens is a professor at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and former president of CUNY Queens College.

The weakest link in the expanding instructional continuum—where we are least successful—is in general education and freshman introductory courses.

Carol Patton is a Las Vegas-based writer who specializes in human resources issues.

As the national movement for unionization continues to grow across college campuses, there’s an important lesson here. Unions typically spring up where inequities are either perceived or actually occur.

Are universities hiring non-tenured adjuncts—who now make up two-thirds of the faculty workforce—because their tenured veterans won’t retire?

Delayed retirement is a contributing factor in the proliferation of adjuncts, says Brian Kaskie, associate professor of health policy at the University of Iowa’s College of Public Health. Employees who can’t be fired and won’t retire are a burden administrators don’t want to assume.

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