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More than half of students go to colleges within 50 miles of their homes.

The twin goals of affordability and diversity dominate the nation’s push to expand access to higher ed, but another critical factor—geography—is drawing more attention for the role it plays in where students go to college.

Anant Agarwal, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, pioneered the MOOCs movement.

Anant Agarwal won the annual Harold W. McGraw Prize in Education, for pioneering the MOOCs movement.

A professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Agarwal is one of the founders and current CEO of edX. The partnership between MIT and Harvard University now includes 70 universities and institutions around the world and serves more than 5 million learners. Agarwal is currently focused on bringing edX course materials to high school classrooms.

As a new study shows one group of students falling farther behind in the struggle to land jobs with salaries that will allow them to pay off debts and achieve financial stability, some experts say it’s the country’s education system that needs to adjust.

Reentry Project class speaker Jamil Watson addressed his peers at a completion ceremony in December 2015.

New momentum has built behind higher education’s pivotal role in helping prison inmates turn their life around and re-enter society. So, what if a city offered convicted felons a college education instead of a jail sentence?

University of Washington law students can study the connections between culture, crime and criminal justice at a prison alongside inmates.

A little time in prison brings University of Washington students much closer to people impacted by the issues they’re studying. Fourth-year law students learn alongside inmates in a seminar class taught at the Monroe Correctional Facility near Seattle.

Soon after becoming president of Georgia State University in 2009, Mark P. Becker set out to answer a question: How can you create a better university, in the heart of a large, diverse city, where many of your students are first-generation or low-income, and who face challenges not seen as commonly at a typical flagship institution.

The national PhD Project has encouraged about 1,000 professionals of color to leave the corporate world to become business school professors.

Lack of diversity among faculty and administrators compounded the racial tensions that drove a wave of student protests—and a handful of high-level resignations—on campuses across the U.S. in the fall of 2015.

President Freeman Hrabowski, who marched in Martin Luther King's civil rights protests of the 1960s, drives the University of Maryland, Baltimore County students to diversify the STEM world.  In the mean time, he has transformed the institution familiarly known as UMBC from a commuter school into a renowned research university.

Janet Dudley-Eshbach is president of Salisbury University in Maryland.

On a cold evening in December 2014, over 400 students, faculty and staff gathered quietly on the central plaza of Salisbury University’s Maryland campus. Chalked on the pavers were the silhouettes of 24 bodies.

As victim names were read, students proceeded to lie down within the outlines and observe several minutes of silence, remembering black men shot by white police officers. Somber remarks were followed by a quiet march of remembrance.

Kinesiology students from Cal State, Fullerton traveled to Greece for a summer study trip focused on philosophy and the Olympics. Student Justin Carrido snapped this group selfie at the Acropolis.

White students accounted for three-quarters of the nearly 300,000 students who studied abroad last school year. But a group of minority-serving colleges and universities is striving to alter that statistic.