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Data

University Business and Mediasite by Sonic Foundry partnered to develop this 2018 survey of the UB audience, exploring the use of artificial intelligence (AI) and academic video in higher education.

Over 300 college and university leaders responded from a variety of types and sizes of institution around the country.

To watch the web seminar about this survey, go to universitybusiness.com/ws091118

9/12/2018

By 2025, graduate enrollment is on track to grow by 3.5 million students. Finding a best-fit student is difficult enough without having to sort through an overabundance of data. Worse, using the wrong data leads to an ineffective recruitment approach, wasting time and resources.

In this on-demand webinar, admissions experts will explain how to classify your typical candidate, examine applicant data and implement the strategies that will lead to enrollment success.

You'll learn how to:

IT leaders are easing concerns across campus about cloud migration—including security, accessibility and cost.

From left to right: Jon MacMillan, Senior Data Analyst, Rapid Insight; Charles Ansell, Chief Operating Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Every institution has access to data that can help to drive more effective decision-making; the challenge is that often it resides in silos around campus. By democratizing data access across the institution and building a data-focused campus culture, staff are empowered to make more effective decisions.

From left to right: Jacqui Spicer, Chief Operating Officer, Baker College; Gus Ortiz, Managed Services Program Manager and Principal Consultant, Jenzabar

Under pressure to contain costs and improve efficiency, many institutions are turning to cloud-based models for their ERP, HR, finance and other crucial systems. Cloud models create more collaborative, interactive environments wherein critical data is more accessible, making more resources available for institutions to better serve students.

From left to right: Lisa McIntyre-Hite, Executive Director of Product Innovation, Walden University; Christopher Sessums, Learning Strategies Consultant, D2L

The demographics of today’s higher ed learners are shifting dramatically. Those once considered nontraditional learners—adults looking to change career paths, workers returning to school for certifications or students requiring flexible learning paths—have become the norm.

How must institutions respond to these changing demographics to meet the evolving demands of these ‘new traditional’ students? How can institutions use technology and data to drive student success and to support continuous improvement in this changing environment?

From left to right: Jon MacMillan, Senior Data Analyst, Rapid Insight; Charles Ansell, Chief Operating Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Every institution has access to data that can help to drive more effective decision-making; the challenge is that often it resides in silos around campus. By democratizing data access across the institution and building a data-focused campus culture, staff are empowered to make more effective decisions.

About 9 in 10 higher ed institutions have cyber insurance compared to approximately 70 percent that were maintaining it in 2015.

Richard L. Riccardi is senior associate provost and dean of libraries at Rider University.

In this era of increased accountability, diminishing resources and fierce competition, institutions have begun to see a culture of data-informed decision-making as a necessity instead of a luxury.

From left to right: Kristen Wallitsch, Associate Dean of Academic Support Student Success Center, Bellarmine University; Drew Thiemann, Director of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, Bellarmine University; Jim Breslin, Dean of Student Success, Bellarmine University

Predictive analytics can serve as the foundation of student success efforts. By drawing together data from disparate campus sources and systems, predictive analytics software can enable institutional leaders to predict the likelihood of student attrition, and to identify at-risk students and match them with the right resources that can help them succeed.

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