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Data

From left to right: Ashok Sankar, Director of Solutions Strategy, Splunk; Kara Gillis, Director of Product Marketing, Splunk.

Higher education institutions are challenged with managing their IT systems as they digitally transform their environments. With new technology trends bucking traditional approaches, research shows a general lack of confidence among IT staff and decision-makers. As budgets tighten and IT is increasingly called upon to modernize institutions, IT practitioners need to look at data-driven decision-making strategies.

Two out of three jobs now demand at least some education or training, confirms new research. Three pathways still remain: a high school education, middle-skills training or education, and a four-year college degree.

What is the state of unstructured data on college campuses today?

There is a huge proliferation of information produced, from emails to applications for financial aid and dorm rooms. Gartner estimates that upward of 80 percent of enterprise data today is unstructured. But the business strategy to capture this content and organize it for efficiency and compliance purposes is lacking.

 Michael Babore is executive vice president of consulting services for Relation Insurance Services’ Education Solutions practice. Neil Majors is president of Relation Insurance Services’ Education Solutions practice.

Learn four ways to better understand and optimize your student health insurance plan.

From left to right: Robert Ruiz, Vice President of Strategic Enrollment, Liaison International; Larry Boles, Professor and Program Director, University of the Pacific; Julie Masterson, Associate Provost, Dean of the Graduate College and Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Missouri State University

By 2025, graduate enrollment is on track to grow by 3.5 million students. Finding a best-fit student is difficult enough without having to sort through an overabundance of data. Worse, using the wrong data leads to an ineffective recruitment approach, wasting time and resources.

In this webcast, admissions experts explain how to classify your typical candidate, examine applicant data and implement the strategies that will lead to enrollment success.

Speakers

Robert Ruiz
Vice President of Strategic Enrollment
Liaison International

9/12/2018

By 2025, graduate enrollment is on track to grow by 3.5 million students. Finding a best-fit student is difficult enough without having to sort through an overabundance of data. Worse, using the wrong data leads to an ineffective recruitment approach, wasting time and resources.

In this on-demand webinar, admissions experts will explain how to classify your typical candidate, examine applicant data and implement the strategies that will lead to enrollment success.

You'll learn how to:

IT leaders are easing concerns across campus about cloud migration—including security, accessibility and cost.

From left to right: Jon MacMillan, Senior Data Analyst, Rapid Insight; Charles Ansell, Chief Operating Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Every institution has access to data that can help to drive more effective decision-making; the challenge is that often it resides in silos around campus. By democratizing data access across the institution and building a data-focused campus culture, staff are empowered to make more effective decisions.

From left to right: Jacqui Spicer, Chief Operating Officer, Baker College; Gus Ortiz, Managed Services Program Manager and Principal Consultant, Jenzabar

Under pressure to contain costs and improve efficiency, many institutions are turning to cloud-based models for their ERP, HR, finance and other crucial systems. Cloud models create more collaborative, interactive environments wherein critical data is more accessible, making more resources available for institutions to better serve students.

From left to right: Lisa McIntyre-Hite, Executive Director of Product Innovation, Walden University; Christopher Sessums, Learning Strategies Consultant, D2L

The demographics of today’s higher ed learners are shifting dramatically. Those once considered nontraditional learners—adults looking to change career paths, workers returning to school for certifications or students requiring flexible learning paths—have become the norm.

How must institutions respond to these changing demographics to meet the evolving demands of these ‘new traditional’ students? How can institutions use technology and data to drive student success and to support continuous improvement in this changing environment?

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