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Cybersecurity

Electronic records are helping to solve storage problems for Rebecca Turner of Central New Mexico Community College, where 4,000 boxes of personnel files and other records must be retained for up to 55 years.

Around 4,000 boxes of paper records fill the shelves in Central New Mexico Community College’s storage area. And many of these boxes—those containing employee personnel files, for example—must remain in storage for up to 55 years before they can be destroyed.

It’s a big reason why CNMCC has embraced electronic records management, says Rebecca Turner, records and property control manager for the Albuquerque college.

Thanks to the use of image capturing verification processes,  students and graduates of Shenandoah U in Virginia need not worry about the accuracy of their electronic transcripts.

Despite the benefits of electronic document management systems, college and university compliance efforts can be undermined by faulty management.

Providers were asked to share their thoughts on what higher ed institutions aren’t paying enough attention to when it comes to compliance and electronic documents/records management. Here’s what they told us:

The intensification of cyberattacks against universities and colleges means institutions need more than just clever passwords and the latest antivirus software to protect themselves from today’s more powerful hackers.

There are a wide variety of products that can automatically control who’s using a network, determine what kind of security their devices have, and even fool hackers into thinking they have successfully infiltrated a computer system.

(Getty Images.com/Patrick George) Today’s hackers are now being deployed around the clock to steal intellectual property, sensitive research, and personal information.

The lone-wolf hacker creating nuisance viruses in a basement has been replaced by sophisticated foreign governments and organized crime rings as the top cybersecurity threat to colleges and universities.

Today’s hackers are now being deployed around the clock to steal intellectual property, sensitive research, and personal information, potentially costing colleges and universities millions of dollars and badly damaging their reputations.

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