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Content Management

The look of instructional technology is changing rapidly, as are the roles and strategies of the IT professional. Higher education technology’s legacy was characterized by six key areas: a strong sense of faculty ownership; hidden costs of free systems and networks; content and delivery mechanisms that were not well-differentiated; unstructured innovation; systems that would neither scale nor integrate; and service levels that were little more than “We’ll give it our best”--all with security being a mere afterthought.

Ten years ago, Auburn University began using E&I Cooperative Services for purchasing, a move that dovetailed perfectly with the school’s shift to a strategic sourcing model of procurement.

As a result, Alabama’s second-largest university now has the time and money to build strong relationships among employees and further increase efficiencies, says Missty Kennedy, director of procurement and business services.

When University of Maryland University College needed a new management solution for business operations, administrators decided to purchase a system using cloud technology rather than upgrade the school’s current software.

“At UMUC, innovation is in our DNA. Executive leadership championed a move to cloud technology because it was a proven innovation,” says Robin Whitfield, associate vice president for student information, human capital and finance systems.

In a nutshell, what is an omnichannel payment approach?

Omnichannel is the ability to take payments anytime, anywhere through any channel. It is also the ability to deliver those payments securely and manage them centrally for easy reporting and administration. Higher ed leaders want to provide a frictionless experience for students, parents and other constituents, as well as streamlined campus operations.

Institutions looking to grow must actively empower staff to ensure that administrative services keep pace with the flood of new students. Implementing the Laserfiche content services platform significantly improved the way Oklahoma Wesleyan University (OKWU) does business, but the more important benefit has been for students, says Systems Administrator Lidija Bell.

For seven years, Southern University and A&M College used a complicated document management system that didn’t work with its new student information system from Banner. So departments rarely used the SIS, and students spent time providing the same information to different departments and completing routine administrative responsibilities at the historically black college in Baton Rouge.

FedEx Office opened a location in the Danforth bookstore of Washington University in St. Louis more than a decade ago, offering services that were not found on campus before its opening.

WashU wanted to provide students and staff an easy way to get projects completed without the inconvenience of having to leave the university, so the relationship with FedEx Office was a natural fit.

When Duke University class of 2008 arrived on campus to start their freshman year, they had no idea they would become pioneers. Why? Because each of the incoming freshmen received a free iPod as part of a program aimed at fostering innovative uses of technology in the classroom. I led the Apple team that helped Duke experiment with creative academic uses for the devices and I was on campus when the students received their free iPods; it was memorable as the students cheered with excitement as each one was given their new mobile device.

It’s not enough today to put together a presentation and talk through the slides. Students have short attention spans and need to be fully engaged with the course material. In this session, Brian Klaas, web systems designer for the Center for Teaching and Learning with Technology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, explains how to create a lively, memorable presentation or online class lecture using the basic structure of a great screenplay. Here are his eight recommendations.

Can you remember the times when PDF files were placed (dumped?) on your website to make their content available online? As you know, those days are gone. PDF-powered websites just don’t cut it anymore—if they ever did. While the file format battle has been won on the web, the content format war is raging in higher education and elsewhere.

Are there any people at your institution who still see writing for the web or social media as a copy-and-paste job from your brochures, viewbooks, or other catalogs? Hopefully not.

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