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WHEN THE UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL Florida's enrollment explosion more than double the number of students since President John Hitt’s arrival in 1992, the institution’s 5,000-seat arena wasn’t cutting it anymore. The student head count at UCF’s main campus in Orlando is now up to around 43,000. But despite assurances of the sort we see in the movies, when administrators began planning for a new arena a few years ago they knew it wasn’t as simple as just getting the project going and everything would be fine. For starters, points out CFO William F.


DON'T WORRY IF YOU can’t express the difference between long-term planning and unified design on a campus. Even architects say they’re fuzzy on the difference.


LONG BEFORE ANY GROUND was broken on $60 million in renovation and new construction projects at Trine University (Ind.) some three years ago, officials at the school were building something far more important: relationships.

SOME MIGHT QUESTION THE need for libraries, with so much now available online. But campus libraries have evolved into much more than information storage facilities, says Joseph Rizzo, an architect for RMJM Hillier. “Libraries are becoming part of the broader academic and social mission.” Typical amenities now include quiet study spaces, meeting rooms, cafes, and even fireplaces.


IT'S BEEN MONTHS, EVEN years, of campaigning for your bond, but once election day is over you can rest, right? Wrong--that's when the real work begins.


Those familiar with the University of New Hampshire often hear its name and first think of Thompson Hall. UNH's original building, circa 1892, stands out on campus and appears everywhere from on letterheads to online. It's listed on the national historic registry, too.



You might call it the 100-bed dash. Yet Warren Wilson College's spring 2003 student housing construction project went off with a flame, not a bang.

In terms of expansion planning, University of St. Francis had done everything right. The Catholic institution in Joliet, Ill., got input from city officials and residents. School officials even had the Cathedral Area Preservation Association's (CAPA) support, which was key with the campus falling within that city section.