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Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is gaining traction as mainstream for many applications in the education and research industries. Commercial enterprises have turned to the “cloud” for years to gain on-demand access to a shared pool of computing resources. Now, with organizations realizing compelling advantages in cost, speed, and efficiency, cloud computing is expanding to meet the needs of a diverse range of industries—and higher education is among the fields taking the plunge in certain application areas.

Integrating mobile devices in learning is getting to be old hat in Abilene, Texas.

As early as 2008, Abilene Christian University (ACU) was the first university in the United States to provide each incoming student with an Apple iPhone or iPod Touch. Each of the nearly 4,800 students on the ACU campus located 180 miles west of Dallas can access course calendars, campus maps, receive homework alerts, security alerts, and answer in-class surveys and quizzes, among other ACUdeveloped web applications.

In the heart of Boulder, Colorado, sits a college where the whole student is greater than the sum of his or her parts. It is a place called Naropa University, where contemplative education encourages students to transform themselves and the world.

With more than 25,000 students, DePaul University in Chicago is the largest Catholic university in the United States. With 10 colleges divided between two campuses, along with three additional satellite campuses, finding certain pieces of information can be challenging for students.

From BYOD environments to high bandwidth applications, there is intense pressure on network infrastructures. Upgrading is a high priority for higher education technology leaders. In this web seminar broadcast on September 20, an administrator from Gordon College in Wenham, Massachusetts described how the school faced those challenges head on when it embarked on a fourth-generation upgrade and redesign of its network to meet the changing demands of its users.

With  smartphones and mobile devices everywhere on campus, students expect complete mobile access to everything from course assignments and grades to events and sports news. This web seminar, originally presented on April 11, 2012, explored how two schools use AT&T Campus Guide, enabling them to keep students and staff connected, informed and engaged while on the go.

Nadir Khan
Education Industry Solutions Consultant
AT&T

To understand how technology can help improve the college application and enrollment process, as well as the professional lives of college admissions officers, one need look no further than the healthcare profession.

  1.  How does the solution fit with your overall technology plan?
  2. Does the solution help move your institution forward?
  3. What is the escalation process?
  4. What is the exit policy?
  5. Will the data be portable and accessible on a different system?
  6. Is the contract flexible enough to accommodate growth, or pull back if needed?
  7. If you can’t customize a SaaS product, does it do what you want? Will you spend as much to customize it as you would on a traditional product?
  8. Does the security and encryption meet industry standards?

Acceptance of cloud computing—the practice of storing data in off-site servers rather than on campus—has been growing by leaps and bounds, at least in some areas. “It’s growing in the areas easier to rip and replace, such as CRM,” says Stan Swete, chief technology officer at Workday, which offers HR and Payroll systems through software as a service (SaaS).

Most colleges and universities attending EduComm send one or two, sometimes three, people to the conference. Last June, Life University (Ga.) sent seven of its administrators and faculty to learn from the breakout sessions and see the latest higher education technology on the EduComm exhibit floor.

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