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Cloud Computing

Cloud email

Numerous advantages are driving cloud email adoption. Migrating email to the cloud offers campuses substantial financial savings and eliminates on-site mail system infrastructure. Schools avoid email server backups, shrink email support time, off-load maintenance, and bypass the need for server-based anti-virus, anti-spam and email filtering products, according to Rich Brown, founder of Dartware, a network monitoring software developer, and a former network manager at Dartmouth College. Decent uptime (when service is up without any downtime) is usually a benefit, as well.

Who is today’s college student?

A new student is emerging. Fewer than half of today’s students fit into the 18- to 22-year-old demographic—now they are 18 to 80. Many students work part time or full time, or have families. They are digital natives. Ninety percent of them have smartphones and half have access to tablets 24/7. Just as when they shop, bank, travel or go out to eat, they have high expectations for higher ed. Many students need online course options. Colleges and universities need to change to meet these expectations in order to thrive.

The safety of students, faculty, staff and visitors is a top priority for Boston University. As a result, BU can have anywhere from 15 to 30 officers working their safety and security command center at once. When an emergency arises, Director of Emergency Management Stephen Morash must quickly determine team members can report to the scene the fastest.

Morash uses Send Word Now from OnSolve to notify his officers, who reply through the app with their status (en route, on site, etc.) and their estimated time of arrival on the scene.

When University of Maryland University College needed a new management solution for business operations, administrators decided to purchase a system using cloud technology rather than upgrade the school’s current software.

“At UMUC, innovation is in our DNA. Executive leadership championed a move to cloud technology because it was a proven innovation,” says Robin Whitfield, associate vice president for student information, human capital and finance systems.

10/4/2018

Students are arriving on campus with a rapidly changing set of goals and expectations. Meeting these expectations while supporting student success across the lifecycle requires institutional transformation, bold strategies and innovative use of technology. Cloud-based systems can be essential to this transformation, but utilizing this technology effectively requires a strategic approach.

IT leaders are easing concerns across campus about cloud migration—including security, accessibility and cost.

Providers answer: What are the most prominent lingering concerns that campus IT administrators have about moving more data into the cloud?

These are: Cloud security is better (or worse), migration is easy and there will be downtime.

From left to right: Jacqui Spicer, Chief Operating Officer, Baker College; Gus Ortiz, Managed Services Program Manager and Principal Consultant, Jenzabar

Under pressure to contain costs and improve efficiency, many institutions are turning to cloud-based models for their ERP, HR, finance and other crucial systems. Cloud models create more collaborative, interactive environments wherein critical data is more accessible, making more resources available for institutions to better serve students.

6/26/2018

Under pressure to contain costs and improve efficiency while maintaining a high level of services, many institutions are turning to cloud-based models for their ERP, HR, finance and other crucial systems. In addition to these advantages, cloud models create more collaborative, interactive environments where critical data is more accessible, making more resources available for institutions to better serve students.

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