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Branding

University Business partnered with FedEx Office to develop and deploy this survey of higher education leaders, exploring the issues and challenges related to the branding or public image of their institutions. Deployed in October 2018, some 300 college and university leaders from a variety of institution types and sizes responded.

How higher ed can rebrand career training.

Karine Joly is the web editor behind collegewebeditor.com, a blog about higher ed web marketing, public relations and technologies. She is also the founder of higheredexperts.com.

Creativity drives the popular social media tool that personalizes content for specific users.

Marc C. Whitt is director of philanthropy communications at the University of Kentucky Office of Philanthropy and teaches event planning in UK’s Department of Integrated Strategic Communication.

For donors to higher ed institutions, events can stir passion, belief and confirmation in the cause for which they invest time, creativity, advocacy and personal resources. Here is how to maximize the relational and marketing benefits of alumni and philanthropic events.

10/18/2018

A variety of factors are causing many colleges and universities to reexamine their branding. Consistent and effective branding can have a positive impact on many strategic efforts, from recruiting and enrollment to marketing and alumni engagement, as well as the overall public image and reputation of the institution.

FedEx Office opened a location in the Danforth bookstore of Washington University in St. Louis more than a decade ago, offering services that were not found on campus before its opening.

WashU wanted to provide students and staff an easy way to get projects completed without the inconvenience of having to leave the university, so the relationship with FedEx Office was a natural fit.

When you watched this year’s Super Bowl, did you notice the higher education corporate partnership messaging? We were all witness to a historic NFL football broadcast from the University of Phoenix stadium in Glendale, Arizona. Think back to other sporting events like National University’s 2014 Holiday Bowl game in San Diego and you’ll find there is no shortage of co-branding and advertising partners in higher education – in fact, we see it all the time.

The needs of those who work and learn in institutions of higher education require environments that reflect their preferences and culture more than ever before. That’s why experiential branding and wayfinding have become integral parts of an institution’s architectural expression. While the brand—the story of who you are and why you exist as an institution— builds distinction (beyond curriculum choices) in the marketplace, wayfinding serves to direct, inform and inspire.

Increasing enrollment is a priority for many institutions. The race is on to create a marketplace distinction in order to attract new students and to retain current students. As if this challenge weren’t enough, colleges and universities are faced with rising costs, reduced endowments and smaller budgets. As campus leaders look for ways to leverage their resources and still accomplish their enrollment and growth goals, one viable strategy is to recognize the role that physical facilities have on student attraction and retention.

Supporting the emotional health of students should be a priority on all campuses, and the nonprofit Jed Foundation is helping to make that happen. Colleges and universities can evaluate the care they provide with JedCampus, a program launched in May.

“Efforts should be made to promote connectedness and reduced isolation,” says John MacPhee, executive director of the program. “Mental health improves the more a student feels like a member of a community.”

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