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University of Ottawa: Secure law education

By: 
UB Custom Publishing
The University of Ottawa won a 2014 AMX Innovation Award in the Alternative Learning Spaces category
Honoree: 
University of Ottawa
The new Ian G. Scott Courtroom at the University of Ottawa has new technology with the required security for government computers.
The new Ian G. Scott Courtroom at the University of Ottawa has new technology with the required security for government computers.

The Ian G. Scott Courtroom design infrastructure had many requirements, as it serves the Provincial Government as well as the School of Law at the University of Ottawa. Strict provincial guidelines, security protocols and standards set by the bar, as well as end-users of the space shaped the attributes, capabilities and communication processes in the space. However, certain requirements were quite clear: Professors and students would require excellent sightlines for viewing the legal proceedings, top-notch automation and redundancy, key technology components, and excellent sound reinforcement and acoustical considerations.

The final solution provides the security required through government computers and cable trays to provide acoustical separation between the rooms. The AMX Enova DGX-32 solution was key to this success due to its built-in software and its ability to ascertain the pass-through reliability of the crimping of each cable and the quality of the connections performed by technical staff. The DGX-32 became the central nervous system of the installation and doubles as the gatekeeper for the provincial security requirements in the courtroom.

The specialized digital media switcher allows the clerk full access and retrieval to any and all sources during courtroom proceedings. As part of the mandate of the provincial government, the clerk could also mute all audio feeds and render the two-way Pro-Display window opaque at the request of the judge during confidential sessions.

“The Ian G. Scott Courtroom will allow all of us to work together,” says Bruce Feldthusen, professor and former dean of the Common Law Section. “Professors, students, judges and lawyers will all be able to engage with one another, creating a laboratory for active learning.”

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