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Professional Opinion

Michael Silton is the executive director of the UCLA Venture Capital Fund.

Over the last 30 years, the number of college courses teaching entrepreneurship has increased by 95 percent, reflecting an intense demand by U.S. college students.

However, in a survey by Entrepreneur magazine, half of students polled reported that lack of resources was their main reason for not creating startups. And the Young Entrepreneur Council found that nearly three-fourths of college students claim they have no access to on-campus entrepreneurial resources.

President Obama recently established a task force to protect students from sexual assault. According to a White House Memorandum of January 22, 2014, one in five female students is a survivor of attempted or actual sexual assault that occurred while in college. The unfortunate and heartbreaking situation with University of Missouri swimmer, Sasha Menu Courey, has recently placed the issue of on- and off-campus sexual assault in the spot light. In 2010, Ms. Courey was allegedly raped by one or more members of the University’s football team.

It would be very easy to be jaded about the future of higher education if it were not for the fact that those of who serve this industry view it as a calling. We know that we can make a difference in the lives of our students and in society. We try to do the very best for our students while addressing the issues of the day through our research and community outreach. Not a bad calling, in my view, and why with great pride I have spent my adult life in the academy serving four institutions over the past thirty years as a faculty member, administrator and now university president.

According to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in every 10 American children over the age of three has been diagnosed with ADHD. Before turning 18, nearly 14 percent of children will have been diagnosed. Most will receive ADHD drugs. Fearing that the popular response to this report will be “shock,” Psychiatrist John T. Walkup and two junior colleagues published a “reassuring” commentary that accompanied the CDC report (Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, November 2013).

A pervasive “because we have to” approach to higher education accreditation is contributing to the growing crisis of confidence in the value of college and the degrees it bestows. When faculty and higher education leaders declare “we complied,” it’s probably not good enough.

Kirk Overstreet is assistant dean for adjunct faculty support at the College of DuPage.

College of DuPage, located just west of Chicago, is one of the largest community colleges in the United States, and it is the largest community college in the Midwest. The institution serves more than 30,000 students and offers a variety of courses, with more than 80 percent of its classes delivered face-to-face.

Jeffrey G. Eisenbarth is vice president for business and finance as well as treasurer for Rollins College.

Central Florida is one of the country’s most popular tourist destinations, so it makes sense that hospitality enterprises can be counted on to provide a financial boost—even to higher education institutions.

I recently had the opportunity to meet with dozens of mobile web leaders from some of the most respected universities. While speaking with experts at schools from Harvard to Princeton, I learned that we’re all struggling with the same challenges in mobile. Fortunately, as we share best practices across campuses around the world, mobile capabilities in higher education are at their most exciting time yet.

Most of us would agree that Safe Hiring and Safe Contracting programs are an important part of college operations. These issues may become more difficult, though, when they are associated with employee hiring or contractor selection processes and the accompanying consideration of various risks, particularly those related to previous criminal behaviors. It can be further complicated by the fact that access to students, faculty and secure facilities must also be considered in the evaluation.

The September 11, 2001 attacks evoked a new era of national security and anxiety. The country responded with sweeping security measures that have sparked a growing concern over perceived violations of individual civil rights and liberties. This national debate surrounding the tension between national or organizational security and individual privacy can be especially complex when played out on one of the most widely recognized free speech forums: a university campus. Consider this hypothetical:

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