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It's a new day at Harvey Mudd. Known for its focus on engineering, science, and mathematics education, the 700-student liberal arts school-part of California's Claremont Colleges consortium-has done well in realizing its vision of attracting the brightest students. And with about 1,600 applications received each year, Admissions staff can be choosy when selecting each 175-student freshman class; about 90 percent of Mudd students were in the top 10 percent of their high school class.

For the last two decades, much of the public and media attention has been focused on the problems in K-12 education. Higher ed coverage was concerned largely with stories on school rankings or sports scandals. Within the industry, of course, there are those who have raised warning flags about quality, about access, and about affordability, yet the mainstream media rarely delved into these complex issues.

From buying paper and furniture to defibrillators and health insurance, consortia of higher ed institutions are saving up to millions of dollars annually on items bought in bulk-while at the same time breeding greater, long-term relationships built on trust. That adds up to saved time, fewer headaches.

06/2006

There is a good deal of talk about the need for accountability today-defining learning outcomes, for example, or asking that faculty be accountable for the effectiveness of their teaching. In short, there is a shift from offering programs and degrees to creating value.

 

During Bill Clinton's 1992 run for the presidency, Democratic strategist James Carville took a simple route to keeping the campaign on message. Carville posted a sign at the Little Rock, Ark., headquarters of the campaign reminding staffers and Clinton of the now-famous phrase, "It's the economy, stupid."

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