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When Harrisburg University of Science and Technology (PA.) opened its doors in 2005, its leaders made sure buildings and classrooms were ready, and that the school's wireless network was robust. One item left off the list was phone landlines.

RECENTLY I MET A FAMILY whose daughter was looking at Rhodes College. The family income was slightly above $20,000. Federal and state funding didn't provide the assistance necessary for the daughter to enroll. Even after adding a substantial commitment from the college to the financial aid package, there was a large financial gap.

It tantalizes the best millennial students with colorful and personalized brochures, screaming the student's name and interests.

 
 

It's no exaggeration to say that college and university governing boards suffer from an identity problem. Administrators have increasingly gravitated toward leadership roles, reducing the board's relevance to essentially being a rubber stamp for strategies and projects that have been determined without their counsel.

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