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During his first year as a dean of the Stanford Law School, Larry Kramer spent most of it talking and listening to people-students, faculty, alumni, venture entrepreneurs, the various "consumers" of the school's "product," its graduates. It was out of this intensive dialogue that the seeds for the new plan for Stanford's "three-dimensional degree program" emerged. The plan, that has already stirred intense interest in the higher education and legal communities, was announced in November 2006.

In the wake of many tragic current events, schools across the nation are aggressively evaluating their current security solutions to ensure they are prepared for emergencies on campus. However, many decision makers within the educational system need help determining what steps should be taken in the evaluation process to ensure they invest in the right technologies for their needs.

FROM RAPIDLY EVOLVING STUDENT demographics and competitive pressures to regulatory changes, colleges and universities face new challenges all the time. One way to confront these realities in the financial aid office is to outsource some financial aid administration duties or student contact center services.

Not long ago, while touring a rural, tree-lined campus in Ohio, the president of a small, under-endowed liberal arts college asked me what new facility would turn around their dwindling admissions. Did they need a new airy atrium in the student union, with wireless internet and cappuccino? Or would a state-of-the-art fitness center attract more prospects?

When University Business editors interview senior higher ed administrators, one of the questions we like to ask is, "What was your smartest business decision?" Over the years that question has yielded a wide range of responses, from the seemingly trivial (such as not delivering junk mail to campus mailboxes) to the far-reaching (energy studies to maximize facility use).

STUDENTS AT MOST COLLEGES AND universities across the nation choose to work for a number of different reasons: as a way to obtain spending money, to help pay tuition, or simply as a social outlet. At work colleges, student jobs are serious business-an integral and compulsory part of the educational journey. Relying on student labor, the small fraternity of work colleges strives to reduce the debt load of students while providing practical work experience.

12/2007

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