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ONE HARDLY NEEDS TO BE A SPACE or transportation planning expert to realize this: Having classes and services on more than one campus presents logistical challenges. Which faculty and staff should be based at the “other” campus? What classes should be held there? What transportation programs are needed? How do you ensure that those heading over there for class don’t miss too much on the main campus because of the travel time?

IN THIS AGE OF 24/7 NEWS, the opportunities for media coverage are wide. But getting institutional ink?whether it’s in a traditional print source, on a website, or via social media?still has its challenges. Often the story isn’t institutional news itself but news related to a faculty member or administrator or news on which one of these experts can comment. Following are 17 ideas for helping to make?and shape?this attention.

AT THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR, President Obama called for a 60-day review of national policies and structures related to cybersecurity. The denial-of-service attacks launched against some government and commercial websites here and in South Korea over the July 4 weekend probably proved the necessity of such a step to any remaining doubters.

A short distance from EduComm, THE expo floor at InfoComm offered plenty of ways to spend stimulus dollars.

EDUCOMM 2009 BROUGHT SOME OF THE brightest stars in higher education to the Ritz-Carlton Orlando, Grande Lakes resort, for three days of education sessions, new product introductions, and fun. The conference featured a number of firsts. For example, it was the first time in six years that EduComm took place independent of InfoComm. Also for the first time, the conference featured five keynote sessions that mixed thought-provoking topics with light-hearted “edutainment” sessions.

Online college fairs can reach more students than fairs held in the high school gym. The experience offered by the three main vendors varies considerably.

IN THE QUEST TO REACH as many students as possible, admissions officers in higher ed are leaving no pixel unturned.

IT WAS THE DISASTER THAT DIDN'T happen, despite the headlines in national and local newspapers throughout the spring of 2008. “College Financial Aid System ‘In Crisis,’” proclaimed USA Today. “No Funds to Lend to 40,000 Students,” blared the Boston Globe. “Student Loans Start to Bypass 2-Year Colleges,” warned The New York Times.

Green?in its duality no other word better reflects opposing forces at work on today’s campuses. For financial leaders, “green” is in short supply as colleges and universities face a financial storm of historic proportions. Endowments are declining, legislative allotments are decreasing, and tuition increases threaten to make higher education inaccessible. At many universities, budget cuts are rampant, causing more than a few leaders to question the very sustainability of the institutions they serve.

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