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UNLIKE CORPORATIONS, HIGHER EDUCATION institutions face unique challenges with IT security. As students arrive each semester with their own computers, many times their security devices are off, their anti-virus software is gone or simply outdated, and odd configurations abound.

"WIRELESS COVERAGE IS NO longer a showstopper anymore," observes Frank Monaco, chief information officer at <b>Pace University</b> (N.Y.). "It used to be a big thing, a selling point. But now it's expected, and if you don't have it, the students aren't coming."

 

During his first year as a dean of the Stanford Law School, Larry Kramer spent most of it talking and listening to people-students, faculty, alumni, venture entrepreneurs, the various "consumers" of the school's "product," its graduates. It was out of this intensive dialogue that the seeds for the new plan for Stanford's "three-dimensional degree program" emerged. The plan, that has already stirred intense interest in the higher education and legal communities, was announced in November 2006.

In the wake of many tragic current events, schools across the nation are aggressively evaluating their current security solutions to ensure they are prepared for emergencies on campus. However, many decision makers within the educational system need help determining what steps should be taken in the evaluation process to ensure they invest in the right technologies for their needs.

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