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Small/Medium Institution Winner:

Strategic placement of food and beverage stations and a roomy servery keep things moving.

Bucknell University (Pa.)

Total full-time enrollment: 3,700

Institution type: Four-year private

Each of our 65 entries was evaluated, using a point system for each response, by at least four members of the University Business team and one external judge, with similar-sized institutions grouped together.

Questions covered:

(1) the extent to which the facility and program uniquely reflect the institution

(2) the comfort and safety levels of diners

(3) sustainability initiatives

(4) the process of getting input from program users and how requests are prioritized

Public Institution Winner:

Virginia Commonwealth University

Total full-time enrollment: 27,000

Institution type: Four-year public

Total number of campus dining facilities (includes any facility serving food; please explain). 23 - 1 residential, 2 c-stores, 20 retail locations including Chili's, Subway, Quiznos and McDonald's

Number of full-service dining facilities (serving three meals a day): 1

Square footage of each main dining facility: 28,500

Large Private Institution Winner:

Counter seating is an option for students dining alone or those who want to be close to culinary action.

Boston University

Total full-time enrollment: 16,070 Undergraduate Students, 8,709 Graduate Students

Lehigh University (Pa.)

Vibrant colors, lighting, and a variety of seating add to the Lehigh deining atmosphere.

Total full-time enrollment: 4,876

Institution type: Four-year private

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