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As huddle rooms within academic buildings grow in popularity, what challenges—perhaps unexpected ones—tend to crop up for administrators and professors? 

Providers were asked: How well are colleges using data to measure faculty performance, and what related areas need the most improvements?

“Colleges will typically show the faculty how their scores compare to others at the school, usually those in the same department. But they rarely ask the instructors how they plan to improve any low scores they've earned or coach them how to do so. Closing this feedback loop will improve the students' experience.”

—Howard Walters, SmartEvals.com

BLUE LIGHT BEACON—Kansas State University Police monitor phone call boxes located throughout the campus.  Besides seeking help in an emergency or reporting other incidents, the community is also encouraged the use the boxes for wayfinding assistance. (Cindy Hollingsworth).

Mobile apps, text alerts, personal panic buttons and other new technologies give students more ways to communicate safety concerns.

What role does visible security technology play in deterring campus crime and giving students, prospective students/families, and others peace of mind?

Measuring faculty effectiveness has never been a perfect science—and it has always held potential for contention among instructors and administrators.

Whether you call them huddle rooms, breakout rooms or collaboration rooms, small group spaces cropping up in various campus buildings are changing the way academic facilities are used.

Teletherapy has been around for more than two decades and can be delivered through videoconferencing, phone or online messaging. (Gettyimages.com: sjenner13).

Here’s what campus administrators need to know about virtual behavioral health services and how to implement them.

Teletherapy has been around for more than two decades and can be delivered through videoconferencing, phone or online messaging.

Alternate terms for teletherapy include telebehavioral health, telepsychiatry, e-behavioral health, telemental health, e-care and telecare.

Multiple peer-reviewed studies, including several meta-analyses, show that teletherapy is as effective as in-person therapy for certain conditions.

A handful of university medical centers around the country offer telemedicine services to the broader community.

Typically, these services are designed to provide options for people who live in remote areas and tend to have less access to health specialists.


Link to main story: TeleHELP in higher ed

Question 1: What are the most common misconceptions about teletherapy services for college students?

“With teletherapy still being relatively new to colleges and consumers, there is often the misconception that this is a new type of healthcare service in itself. But teletherapy is just a means of providing therapy as we’ve known it through a medium that creates more access for more students.”

—Cody Semrau, founder and CEO, BetterMynd

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