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A new movement that promises closer cooperation between higher ed and K12 aims to end a legacy of passing the buck.

BEREA, KENTUCKY—President Lyle Roelofs likes to buy running shoes for his students at Berea College—as long as they get some exercise with him twice weekly before class.

Knitting: Lyle Roelofs, the son of a Protestant preacher, knits sweaters with a pattern of cascading hearts he believes is unique. It’s a passion his mother taught him. Though he also makes scarves, mittens and socks for friends, family and their pets, it’s a solitary hobby—he doesn’t post on any of the online bulletin boards that draw large numbers of knitters.

Read on for a closer look ahead at where administrators in various functional roles will be this year—and what actions other institutions are making in 2018.

“In the beginning, I was focused on developing systems and processes. Now, I see that role becoming more of a mentor and facilitator of performance improvement.”

Here, we reflect on the major events in 2017 that will continue to shape the higher ed landscape in 2018 and beyond.

Free community college spreads: New York introduced its Excelsior scholarship for students from families with income less than $100,000. The challenges of free tuition also became apparent, as Oregon and other states grappled with fewer budget dollars than needed to accept every applicant.

Admissions, enrollment, marketing, retention and financial aid administrators surveyed generally have a sunny outlook about the student population in 2018.

Higher ed leaders love an opportunity to tout the beauty of their campuses, and continuous construction gives them a lot to talk about.

Here are seven things higher ed search leaders and administrators believe campus administrators must do in the coming year to get the job done.

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