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Date: October 13, 2017, during the annual reunion and homecoming weekend and to celebrate a new capital campaign 

Offices involved: Procurement Services partnered with the Institute Advancement Events Department and Presidential Events group, along with a cross-functional team representing groups from all over campus, including student activities, student life and public safety.

Timeline:

Here’s what colleges paying attention to the potential of digital signage as a revenue source—directly or indirectly—are doing to make it work.

Increasingly sophisticated cameras may enhance security, but they also raise privacy concerns.

Administrators must confront these issues when upgrading surveillance technology and tracking the analytics it generates, advises Larry Consalvos of IXP Corporation, the company that provided software, consulting and project management for Cal State, Northridge’s systems.

CREDIT CONVERSATION—Conferences of the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships help ensure dual enrollment students experience a seamless transition into college. (Todd Goodrich).

Colleges and universities in 47 states engage with school district partners to offer dual enrollment programs, in which courses are taught on college campuses, at high schools or online.

A failure to gather data—not rigor or readiness—may be the biggest issue facing early college programs, believes Jason Taylor, an assistant professor of higher education at the University of Utah who has devoted his career to studying dual enrollment.

“There is not a lot of empirical evidence on whether the benefits outweigh the costs,” he says.

Dual enrollment is designed to increase access and degree attainment. In fact, a 2007 study found that 67 percent of dual-enrollment students enrolled in college after high school (compared to 50 percent of their peers), with 30 percent earning an associate’s degree along with their high school diploma.

Yet students often experience barriers to enrollment.

Now hearing-impaired students can see real-time captioning of spoken events, also referred to as live captioning.

Whether it’s on-site or remote, captions will vary in quality, says Margaret Camp, director of student accessibility services at Clemson University.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) is considered the most accurate level of transcription, which is “utterance-for-utterance,” she says.

The captionist types everything heard. However, this level of accuracy costs twice as much as another form of live captioning, called “meaning-for-meaning.”

 Crowd-powered captioning Like with crowdfunding, the future of live captioning may be powered by a group.

With professional captionists costing as much as $100 per hour, a lower-cost solution is in the works to allow groups of average typists to provide real-time captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. Legion:Scribe is making that happen.

What roadblocks are colleges coming up against in expanding access for hard-of-hearing students during class and at live events?

“While budgets and regulatory awareness can be roadblocks to accessing university classes and events, technology is the greatest challenge to delivering live captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

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