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LEARNING BY DOING—Students who are a best fit for New York Institute of Technology tend to enjoy hands-on problem-solving and can pursue programs such as electrical and computer engineering.

College admissions teams now go beyond zip codes and SAT scores to micromatch students who are most likely to apply to, enroll in and succeed at their institutions.

In what ways do you see colleges falling short in utilizing data to make better admissions recruitment and acceptance decisions? What kinds of data should they be using more of or better?

“Many colleges are not viewing their admissions decisions through the lens of retention and degree completion. Institutions should understand the profile of their most successful students, refine their recruiting strategy accordingly and ensure they are allocating their financial aid to maximize both yield and retention.”

—Darren Catalano, CEO, HelioCampus

Athletics at the community college level bring far less pomp, circumstance, attention and money than their NCAA Division I counterparts. But that doesn’t mean they don’t play a significant role.

Deciding exactly what to dedicate funding and space to within residence halls can be a challenge. The answers to a few key questions are important to developing effective offerings.

What are some ways that you’ve seen student services within residence halls grow to meet student needs and expectations?

“Letter-centric mailrooms are not prepared to handle the packages and the expectation of doorstep-service associated with e-commerce. Students want low-touch retail, and administrators want to offer streamlined, cost-effective and safe services.

A new movement that promises closer cooperation between higher ed and K12 aims to end a legacy of passing the buck.

BEREA, KENTUCKY—President Lyle Roelofs likes to buy running shoes for his students at Berea College—as long as they get some exercise with him twice weekly before class.

Knitting: Lyle Roelofs, the son of a Protestant preacher, knits sweaters with a pattern of cascading hearts he believes is unique. It’s a passion his mother taught him. Though he also makes scarves, mittens and socks for friends, family and their pets, it’s a solitary hobby—he doesn’t post on any of the online bulletin boards that draw large numbers of knitters.

Read on for a closer look ahead at where administrators in various functional roles will be this year—and what actions other institutions are making in 2018.

“In the beginning, I was focused on developing systems and processes. Now, I see that role becoming more of a mentor and facilitator of performance improvement.”

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