You are here

Feature

 Crowd-powered captioning Like with crowdfunding, the future of live captioning may be powered by a group.

With professional captionists costing as much as $100 per hour, a lower-cost solution is in the works to allow groups of average typists to provide real-time captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. Legion:Scribe is making that happen.

What roadblocks are colleges coming up against in expanding access for hard-of-hearing students during class and at live events?

“While budgets and regulatory awareness can be roadblocks to accessing university classes and events, technology is the greatest challenge to delivering live captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

Under Jairy Hunter’s leadership, Charleston Southern changed its name when it achieved university status, dropping the word “Baptist” in 1990.

Jairy Hunter has spent the majority of his career with a few thousand students at small, private Charleston Southern University, but he rose through the ranks at a series of larger, public institutions.

After earning a master’s degree in student personnel, Hunter became assistant to the president at Blue Ridge Community College, also in North Carolina, where he began to learn the intricacies of running a campus.

Their form and function may vary, but there’s one trait nearly every president’s residence has in common: It’s much more than just a home.

Why should colleges and universities invest financial resources in augmented and virtual reality?

“Augmented and virtual reality systems can actually reduce the financial burden on university and college programs that require a lot of consumables or expensive hands-on training systems. … I’ve seen a community college reduce the cost of its welding program from $2,800 to $1,800 per student per semester based on material savings alone.”

—Gary Daniels, consultant, Amtek Company

Colleges and universities have turned their attention to areas on campuses that generate tremendous amounts of waste in small amounts of time: their stadiums and arenas.

What might an institution do to avoid mistakes in executing game-day waste plans?

“When greening your game day, it’s important to work with stadium vendors to procure materials that you know can be recycled, composted or reused to ensure higher diversion. Education is key, as changing consumer behavior takes time. Be clear and consistent in what you ask fans to do on game day.”

Janette Micelli, manager, external communications, Waste Management

The trend toward greener game days is most pronounced among the big athletic schools, given their more plentiful resources, says Julian Dautremont-Smith, director of programs for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.

At the same time, colleges where sports are less prominent can still find ways to integrate sustainability into game days.

It’s really about the same strategies of recycling and composting.

Take a look inside the minds of leaders of campus fleets as they share their major concerns and what they’re doing to keep things moving along.

Pages